Big Sale on Affinity products!

50% off on everything!

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I wonder if there’s a value proposition for going from inkscape to affinity. I can’t think of anything affinity does that Inkscape can’t. Anyone have a compelling feature to tempt me?

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No…not really. Only reason I switched from Inkscape to Affinity when I first started learning was because of my personal opinion that Affinity was more intuitive and user friendly. I was hoping to update to v. 2 of designer a bit ago, but realized that my OS is too old. Dang!

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Yeah, I think that geek to nurse thinks the same thing about affinity, she also switched. At this point I’m so dialed in on inkscape I just wonder if that even matters to me. Like affinity might be more user-friendly but I’ve already done all the work with inkscape so I’d just be signing up for a learning curve for no reason?

There is also the matter of I’m just kind of curious. Hmm.

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I think they offer a demo…at least they did some time ago. Go to their website and see. It’s taken me 7 years to learn what I have now…and I’m sure there’s tons that I still don’t know.

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Id honestly say if Corel draw went on sale that would be better than affinity

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I think the appeal is the suite of products.

Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign
Designer,Photo,Publisher
Inkscape,Gimp,Scribus (not really intended to work together as a suite)

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Considering it probable that those working with Inkscape or Blender still need a raster editor and neither has much raster built in, it is likely they would be familiar with Gimp. And vice versa to a lesser extant.

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Slightly different for me… After using Illustrator for work, I used Inkscape for years working on personal projects and absolutely hated everything about it. When I found Affinity Designer I felt that my prayers had been answered!

That being said, trying to talk anyone out of using their favorite tool is a losing proposition. Some folks love Inkscape, and there’s no reason for them to switch (IMHO). Pretty much like arguing religion or politics – you simply cannot change anyone’s mind. This was perhaps best said by Robert A. Heinlein: “Never attempt to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and annoys the pig.”

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I don’t take it as trying to be convinced but I am very curious about what it is specifically you can point to about inkscape that you didn’t like that affinity fixed for you. Can you give examples?

I like scape well enough but maybe I’m living in a cave and don’t know what I’m missing.

I just don’t like the GUI, despite the upgrades that have been made since I first tried version 0.40 about twenty years ago. Two particulars: (1) needing to shift-click to set stroke color from the goofy color palette across the entire bottom of the app window, and (2) needing to dive two layers deep to change the stroke size. No doubt there are alternative ways to access these, but AD (like AI) puts both on their top-level interfaces by default.

Again, I’m not saying it’s a bad tool, per se, just that it’s a bad choice for my workflow. YMMV, naturally.

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I bought the suite of products for the compatibility. My daughter was interested in designing print pieces (is desktop publishing, still the term?) so I got Affinity with the Apple App store family plan.

For layouts, something like Publisher or inDesign are going to make it easier, since they have features specifically for the task.

Not really relevant anymore, but the first time I tried installing Inkscape was pain, it required X11 to run it. It was not as easy as installing Illustrator 88. :wink:

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My very first download of Inkscape was after I purchased my Glowforge (but before delivery) I had a lot of experience with Autocad, and quite a bit with Gimp and Blender, but just trying out all the commands gave me a basic ability with Inkscape, though being skilled in the others probably helped.

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