Challenge!

Okay, who can make one of these on their GF?

3 Likes

Looking at the layers of metal, this exact thing is not possible on the :glowforge:

Something similar with pins might be possible, but it is not going to be that detailed with the metal work.

2 Likes

Wood is totally acceptable.

Even with wood, the layers and curves would be very difficult to create (if not impossible). Would still require creative use of glue (for the curved layering) and metal pins for the axles.

The :glowforge: is great at creating layered items, but the angles and curves required for this are not possible without secondary machining of the pieces.

3 Likes

Could do the rings in engraved raw (non-backed, non-adhesive) veneer, soaked in water to make it flexible and formed into hoops. You’d need to pin the layers together to make hinges.

Scale it up a bit and make it a bracelet, pretty attainable. Not sure how strong it’d be, but it would probably work if you were determined.

2 Likes

that thing would easily break as wood cut that thin you would have to be sooo careful

2 Likes

I made a time turner, but it didn’t have that many rings. Also it was a LOT bigger. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

The Glowforge could definitely make cuts this fine, but I can’t think of a material that would be strong enough for the design. Any kind of wood you cut into a ring that thin would just turn to sawdust when handled.

4 Likes

Too bad. I guess I have fallen into the ‘GF can do ANYTHING!’ trap.

Take a piece of card stock and put a light layer of decoupage glue on the card stock. Put the card stock in the Glowforge for engraving and cutting.

The pieces can now be easily shaped.

3 Likes

Wow that is gorgeous!

4 Likes

Wow, I like that idea! Loved your recent leather work also - very sporran like!

1 Like

Thank you my dear for the kind compliment.

Regarding your ring —- there is a product on the market that is used to make a light material rigid.

This is how I remember using it. I made a three dimensional snowflake out of copy paper. I pierced a tiny hole on the snowflake and ran a fishing line through the hole. I took my snowflake and dipped it into this product . Hung the snowflake outside and the excess product dripped off. 24 hours later my paper snowflake was not permanent.

Maybe someone who reads my post can remember the name of the dipping product.

2 Likes

Ooh, I hope so! I’ll research it, too.

1 Like

I believe it’s called “Stiffy”. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

3 Likes

@Jules ROTFLMAO!!! I would have remembered the name Stiffy.

I know the dipping product is used to make Catholic Rosary beads from roses, You take dried rose petals and lightly mist them with water. Shape the rose petals around a tiny round bead. After the the petals are shaped then they get dipped into this product.

This weekend I am going to travel back in time to Windows 98. We have an old desktop that still works and I know that project is somewhere on that computer. I will find it and come back and become the thread hero and help this dear forum member.@kmblair

2 Likes

@kmblair

Traveling back in time worked. Looking forward to seeing your project. When I used this product there were not any YouTube videos or Pinterest ideas. Check out the YouTube videos and Pinterest.

@Jules Here is the Tennessee version of your Texas version of Mr. Stiffy

3 Likes

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

2 Likes

I’m appalled that you all could think I would stoop so low…it really is called Stiffy, and it’s a fabulous product! (I dipped a crocheted doily in it once and turned it into a bowl… it lasted for over 20 years! And got very dusty. Never try to turn a crocheted doily into a ruffly bowl.) :rofl: :wink:

(I have some of the Diamond Glaze too.)

2 Likes