Engraving or scoring on ArtResin

Has anyone successfully engraved or scored on ArtResin brand resin? I just called ArtResin to ask if this is possible and safe, and she said “Yes, definitely”, without skipping a beat.

But I’ve seen conflicting info on the thread, so wondering if anyone has experience or advice here.

Thanks!

My understanding is that once an epoxy has set and cured it’s inert and should be perfectly safe. But as always… check the MSDS (or MDS as I think it’s called now).

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Without a data sheet, I’d be reluctant. Most epoxy resin is based on epichlorohydrin, an organochlorine compound.

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I’ve seen the question asked here, but I don’t remember anyone reporting back that they’ve done it. Maybe you’ll be the first! :slight_smile:

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Eeeks, that sounds bad…“These pesticides cause neurological damage, endocrine disorders, and have acute and chronic health effects”

Here’s what I found on the ArtResin website “BPA, as well as another material called Epichlorohydrin (ECH), are precursors to epoxy, however they are fully reacted in the process of making the epoxy resin, which means that only trace amounts are left over after the manufacturing process.”

Yes, definitely reluctant. Sigh.

Yes, I searched the thread and I saw no mention of anyone going through with this.

I’ll keep doing some research.

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It’s more about the release of chlorine as a gas, it can permanently damage the machine. It’s why you can’t cut vinyl and other PVC products.

I don’t know if the ECH releases chlorine gas when cut or engraved.

It’s seems that’s what they are saying on their site…, i’m guessing when they say fully reacted they are saying inert.

“BPA, as well as another material called Epichlorohydrin (ECH), are precursors to epoxy, however they are fully reacted in the process of making the epoxy resin, which means that only trace amounts are left over after the manufacturing process.”

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That’s what it sounds like to me.

Demand the MSDS from ArtResin, that’s required to exist. Then you’ll see the chemical makeup to determine if laser safe

It’s a safety thing so they can’t say it doesn’t exist

That means when cured/solidified, it’s safe to handle. It doesn’t mean vaporizing it would not release harmful chemicals. It also doesn’t mean it would.

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I have been searching around on this as well. We’re all doing a lot of trailblazing…

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Note - these guys are an unofficial source for what you can and can not use, they put epoxy resin in the “do not” category but for poor performance, not volatile chemical reasons.
http://atxhackerspace.org/wiki/Laser_Cutter_Materials

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Thanks for this…I didn’t know about MSDS. I’ll request from them.

There’s a link to it right on the site. :slight_smile:https://www.artresin.com/pages/sds

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Looks fine based on that.

Eeeks, okay, that’s another good thing to research. Thanks so much the info.

Thanks so much, I’ll check it out.

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That’s sort of in “normal use” the problem with laser cutting is you decompose the molecules back into their constituents (so even if chlorine is bound like it is in PVC, you break those bonds and get back molecular chlorine gas). So yeah, this probably isn’t advisable. They will tell you the decomposition products on the MDS.

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I wonder why their customer service so readily responded with a resounding yes to a laser cutter and their product.

Thanks for the tip on decomposition in regards to fire it says…“Decomposition products may include the following materials: carbon
dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, and/or carbon oxide”

I don’t know temp of laser…