Error Message leaves you pondering

So making a big engraved LED backlit sign for a niece’s wedding. Well I submitted the job (which it warned had a lot of steps, yah thanks!) anyway it got an error that one of the closed shapes was open. Sigh, but don’t help me out in some way to know where the shape is. There must be a few thousand shapes total, so kind of out of luck since it doesn’t at least give a hint with the step highlighted or even better what shape is open on the screen. I am sure if I looked at the illustrator file I might find it, but who knows. The drinks shapes are embedded PNG files (which was causing an initial loading error when they were vector shapes, so I rendered them into a PNG). Essentially the only vector shapes are the letters and arrows and those black boxes (the lines) up top

I submitted this to support for a suggestion

(don’t worry the sign is flipped to engrave on the back)

2 Likes

I don’t know about the open shapes, but did you know that you have the words “Elderberry liquer” very tiny, superimposed in reverse, over your cup shape?

3 Likes

Wow! Eagle eye proofreading. I think there is another word in the cup rim and one in the fruit as well.

Screenshot 2023-09-28 at 10.02.30 PM

4 Likes

Oh thanks I had eliminated that in the actual version. There was some very weird selection behavior in the latest Illustrator update

2 Likes

Seems like it’s a bug that open shapes don’t work. The SVG specification permits fill for open shapes in a well-defined way, and vector editors will display it correctly.

2 Likes

If you want to post or send me your SVG file, I can try to fix it.

2 Likes

Hello, Sir or Madam or Whom it May Concern! Has your step lost its spring? Pet dander got you down? Have your radiators lost their lustre? Well, say goodbye to yesterday and hello to Saturday afternoon with the new miracle cure that all the kids are talking about! Now before you close that big ol’ door in my face, let me just stick my foot in… there we go… and I’m asking for only five minutes, that’s right, eight and a half minutes of your time to Change Your Life. Am I selling something? Now, here I thought we were friends, let’s not sully our relationship so soon with impertinent questions. Just watch the video and remember the three keys to success: A E R. Always Engrave Rasters! Is there anything else I can help you with today? No? You’re very welcome. There’s going to be a short survey at the conclusion of our encounter and I hope you’ll be able to give me full marks, as anything less than five stars will banish me back to the nightmare realm.

4 Likes

Oh thanks, will do (on my iPad but when I get to my Mac I will). The problem I am really complaining about (I mean I can just render the entire image as a png then it doesn’t matter, is more the GF’s UI. I mean this error is more like the vague compiler error “syntax error near line 145”. When I was learning COBOL in college, the DEC (y’all can go pound sand with the geriatric jokes) compiler on the Vax used to just say “syntax error in xxxx x.cobol” yeah not very helpful at all, and this is akin to that (although to seem even more aged, it was a way better error than you got on the IBM 360’s compiler in VM/CMS (it was so awful I declared a work that I would not further the cause of COBOL and would only write in 360 assembler (not one of my better life choices) which helpfully threw a core-dump when you crashed. The first time that happened a guy literally rolled up to my cubical with a palette of shrink wrapped paper (like 20-30 reams worth) all bound with yellow tape, which was the core dump (yeah by default the printer was the core dump destination and it gave me all 16MB printed as one column of hex and an attempted decompilation of the contents. Yeah that quickly inspired me to get help to redirect core dumps to the null device (they didn’t call it that unlike Unix/linux)

For the nerds in the crowd (let’s be honest we are on a laser cutter forum… :roll_eyes:) the ibm 360 (the classic mainframe) didn’t have a stack, so jumping to an address was easy, but a subroutine which on every processor I had ever worked on was a single command which was something like JSR and the CPU took care of storing all the return location info onto the stack before it jumped and the subroutine had some sort of return statement to get back to the place that called it; but the 360 without a stack meant that you the programmer had to build your own stack (add to the list of things never to do: get in a land war in Asia, bet against a Sicilian when death is on the line, build your own stack!) because what has 2 thumbs and discovered a fatal bug in the assembler by building his own stack. Yeah this guy, and I somehow managed to return my tiny little I/O driver code outside the VM (yeah that shouldn’t be possible, it took down the entire 3090-600 and dumped like 1200 people on the floor) since it not only toasted my VM it toasted the host OS that managed all the VMs (while everyone in modern IT thinks containers are some new concept the mainframe had them in the early 80s, ot to solve the problem modern containers do, but it made security and multi-tasking way easier if every user was on his own private VM (well unless one of those VM’s was for me…)

3 Likes

I had an epiphany somewhere around 1998 when I was doing ISP tech support. The customer was having a problem with their Outlook Express e-mail. They’d open it and it would pop up a message saying, and I quote verbatim: “An error has occurred.”

This was back in the days when nobody cared about privacy and I could just tail the logs to see what was going on in detail. Thus, I could witness their computer trying to log in, and our mail server responding “Incorrect password”. If Outlook Express passed the error message on to the user, they would have immediately been able to solve their own problem. But instead, it said “An error has occurred”.

I envisioned a programmer somewhere in Redmond writing the code to do this instead of the useful thing. And at that moment I decided that some day I wanted to be a manager. In my head that meant I would wander around a big room full of programmers, looking over their shoulders. And when I saw someone writing printf("An error has occurred."), I would smack them with a stick, zen master style.

6 Likes

Oh god, in that era, MS was still into “extreme programming” which meant 1 programmer wrote that, and then convinced a second programmer that it was a good idea!

2 Likes

So I wimped out and just rasterized the contents, but for shear morbid curiosity:

signature cocktails sign OPEN.svg.zip (930.6 KB)

I figured a 600dpi raster that large would be huge, but actually the total was only 3.4mb in size, which is fine…

3 Likes

Hmm. Affinity Designer doesn’t find any open curves, and it loaded into the GF interface without error for me. Maybe because you took out the extra text.

2 Likes

It loads fine for me, but if I click print it processes and returns the error message.

1 Like

That’s why I became extremely good at writing code that didn’t barf (not to say it wouldn’t fail but that failures were dealt with gracefully). I am not a patient guy and submitting the compile or test run and then waiting for it to execute in the dev/test region took too long because I was in there with hundreds of other folks.

But if I redirected it to the production regions my stuff would fly in & back out because of the job priority and prod resources. If everything worked it was extremely unlikely an operator would catch the unauthorized job. But if it crashed everything would have been exposed and cost me serious employment points :slightly_smiling_face:

The extra time devoted to making sure it wouldn’t go rogue or crash was still way less than sitting around waiting for the proper way to do things. I also got about 5 times more work done than anyone else so it was a win-win for everyone except maybe the guy who decided on resource allocations for the prod vs dev regions.

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed after 30 days. New replies are no longer allowed.