Help me find a pattern for toy clock with gears


#1

I know this must exist somewhere. If it doesn’t I don’t mind making it myself, but why reinvent the wheel? Do you know of a wooden toy clock cut pattern that allows the minute hand to drive the hour hand?


#2

not really a finnal clock plan - but I think a starting point :slightly_smiling:
gear Template


#3

Hope this will be helpful. :sunglasses:


#4

I am not a horologist, but here is a good how to on the basics of what makes a clock work. It explains the gear relationship for hour, minute, second. Also the escapement which regulates the power of the spring/weight and the pendulum.


#5

Wow, quite involved! I was thinking of something much simpler, just a 12:1 ratio set of gears, probably planetary, that would allow the minute hand, when moved, to move the hour hand in a realistic way. Just a way to teach kids how to tell time and a fun toy to play with. Would be fun to watch the gears move inside too. I’ve found some clock patterns but they’re all much more complex than I need. I’ll probably have to use those as a starting point and cobble a simpler version together myself.


#6

Perhaps you can find an inexpensive toy clock for teaching time and take it apart and see how it is out together. I’ll try that. My sister-in-law teaches kindergarten and she be thrilled with some bespoke clock faces for the kids. Although analog clocks, gosh, is learning about them going to go the way of penmanship?


#7

Off-topics, but here are watches handmade in Japan for just $250-$400.
http://watches.ishinchi.com/product-category/dedegumo/


#8

Here’s a link with someone who desires to do a clock with laser cut acrylic gears. Has some good illustrations on gearing.
http://www.noah.org/science/clock/


#9

While not a toy, there is a pattern for a wooden gear (working) clock in the Summer 2013 issue of Scrollsaw Woodworking & Crafts - issue 51. You may also want to check out the program Gearotica for designing gear movements.