Identifying materials


#1

While I’m not aware of a cheap device to identify materials it would be kind of cool to have something like a SCiO (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/903107259/scio-your-sixth-sense-a-pocket-molecular-sensor-fo/description) that I could use to check materials or even provide feedback into the Glowforge library for cutting/engraving as well as identify hazardous materials like vinyl before putting them in.

Does anyone know of something like this?


#2

Perhaps the glow Forge could print a test pattern, and use the camera to figure out what happened, in order to profile different materials.


#3

Anything reasonably priced that would identify acceptable materials…would be OUTSTANDING!


#4

You can identify plastic by setting fire to it, making observations of flame colour and smell, etc, and then consulting a chart like this: http://www.boedeker.com/burntest.htm. Best to do it outside of course.


#5

I was thinking of something without fire. :slight_smile:


#6

Thought ofGene Hackman and Peter Boyle.


#7

There are machines that can do this, but they are very expensive.
They are handheld X-ray fluorescence devices “xrf guns” and they cost a few grand, but they can give you a detailed breakdown of the elements in something without destroying it. Or using fire. :smile:

XRF Analyzer

Figure out how to make a cheaper one and you can buy as many Glowforges as you want!


#8

$49.99 It is only for metals though. http://www.rotometals.com/product-p/XRF_Test.htm?gclid=Cj0KEQjwjIy5BRClh8m_9Zu64d8BEiQAtZsQfzWPUjCg4RU6cA1zsowifchiydOLiW74XLIftSyLNmsaAuw28P8HAQ


#9

Ha, you had me freaking out there for a minute.
I really want an xref gun, but they cost $$$$$
That links is selling a service where you send your sample to them, they scan it and send it back.
For little things that might be fine, but for big chunks of metal, not so much.


#10

Ah, I was in a hurry and I guess I saw the device without fully reading it. Oooops!


#11

“$49.99! - I would have one!”