Laser scraps

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Put your honeycomb on top at the same time and you can burn all the gunk off too

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I have a burn barrel. Everything that comes in the mailbox goes in, along with my GF scraps.

I’ve seriously considered getting rid of the mailbox and just painting “deposit here” on the barrel. I do get the occasional online purchase via “US Mail”, though.

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I often tell people, When I am using my Glowforge,
My neighbors don’t know if I am BBQing of cooking meth

:stuck_out_tongue:

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I try to use as much scrap as possible for smaller projects but the stacks of used wood gets out of hand. Given the rainy/cold northwest, (10 months out of the year) its been great kindling for the wood stove and fire pit.

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I put any unusable scraps in the garbage, so all the captured CO2 that wood is naturally made of can stay sequestered from the atmosphere for at least a few decades more.

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I used to use a burn barrel. It was a handy way to get rid of scraps and junk mail. Then last weekend my neighbor kindly informed me that burn barrels have been illegal in my county since 1976!

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Surprisingly burn barrels are illegal even here in nowhere WV. I can clear cut 100 acres with a bulldozer, build a house without any inspections, start a million chicken farming operation without public input or environmental check but can’t use a burn barrel.

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Here in Denver every house had an incinerator in the backyard, and anything that would burn went up in smoke. It was about the mid '70’s that it was outlawed. The only people who knew what the carbon cycle was were scientists.

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Lol. I’ve considered putting my blue (recycle) box beside the mailbox so the mail carrier can just put all those flyers where they are going anyway.

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We quit paying extra for “recycling” in the 90’s when we watched the regular trash trucks dump it in with the rest of the trash.

I used to be pretty rabid about taking it to recycling dumpsters at the fire station or whole foods, for about a decade - but they all went away. So now I just burn it.

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I am on the verge of a scrap purge. I was up on a ladder in the garage yesterday, putting away the Xmas decoration bins. Looking down from above, it seemed the entire garage was one big stack of scrap. Time for some of that to go…

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Here our trash is incinerated for power.

This fire pit is great. :slight_smile:

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Just trash from the house

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First time I drove for hours to find every recycle dumpster gone or full…

Got the burn barrel a short time later. Local oil change place, they couldn’t “sell” it so I bought them a pizza.

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I’m thankful that under 10% of waste in the US goes to an incinerator. Even after China stopped taking plastic “recycling” from the US, about 78% of the recycling stream does end up getting bought from recyclers according to Republic Services (which serves 44 states) and 2021’s Recycling Markets Subcommittee. Plastic is iffy, but you can be pretty confident that tape-free shipping boxes and aluminum cans will actually get recycled.

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Another way to reuse wood scrap is to burry it under a garden bed and call it hugelkultur :wink:

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Termite food :slight_smile:

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Don’t forget that you’ve been manipulated into thinking that your personal choices on carbon amount to much of anything.

The idea of a personal carbon footprint was popularized by a large advertising campaign of the fossil fuel company BP in 2005, designed by Ogilvy.[12] It instructed people to calculate their personal footprints and provided ways for people to “go on a low-carbon diet”.[14] This strategy, also employed by other major fossil fuel companies[15]borrowed heavily from previous campaigns by the tobacco industry[16] and plastics industry to shift the blame for negative consequences of those industries (under-age smoking,[17] cigarette butt pollution,[18]and plastic pollution[19]) onto individual choices. Benjamin Franta, a J.D. and PhD student at Stanford Law School who researches law and the history of science, called this advertising campaign “one of the most successful, deceptive PR campaigns maybe ever.”[7]

And while it’s a fallacy to abandon small measures toward a larger problem (it is clearly better to use less carbon where possible), it’s just not significant at this time. Take the super bowl:

And that’s just one event.

In the face of large scale polluters like the air travel industry and concrete manufacturers and global shipping, the carbon in your wood scraps isn’t even a drop in the bucket, especially since it’s on the short carbon cycle. Individual carbon footprints are a red herring on a massive scale.

Context for US emissions:

And globally

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Yep, pretty depressing knowing that everything that we think is doing good is just twisted marketing. Although I’d bury my scraps in my garden beds because it makes them better, and squishy wood helps hold water on my property longer so I don’t need to water my plants manually.

It has been really neat seeing how much water my mini-swales are diverting and soaking into the ground, and I’m just getting started! My plan is a full overhaul of the backyard this year, which includes lots of digging :sweat_smile:

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