Mantel clock

I had a clock face insert laying around, so I decided to make a clock for my mantel. When it was done, I liked it, but then I didn’t like the clock face. Luckily, I made the panel removable with (my favorite) magnets, so I did another one. This one was a lot of fun, as I tried out stone inlay. Even though it was tough to get it sanded flush, I think it ended up looking cool.

Here’s the original:

And here’s the latest:

Only thing is, the wood I had for the top was warped. I was hoping it would flatten out when I glued and clamped it, and it did mostly. But there’s still a slight bump. I guess I can live with it though!

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Oh, I really like that - especially the stone inlay! I still have a clock part lying around I need to do something with…

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Gorgeous! :grinning:

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That’s great. I love how different it is with the face as the clock instead of holding the clock

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Thanks! I like it better without the clock insert too.

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Both clocks are nice, but the second iteration is clearly superior. Nicely done.

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Stone inlay? That sounds very complicated… did you carve the stone and sand it down to match pattern cut? (That sounds really hard to me…)

The result is beautiful! I just don’t understand how you did it.

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Ha ha, no I didn’t do that. I ordered this from Amazon:

Also got some of this, but haven’t used it yet. I look forward to it though!

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That is amazing!!! I love them both!!!

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Wow, that is awesome! Thanks for sharing! That sounds MUCH easier than what I was thinking you meant…

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It’s a game changer for sure! The only thing I will say is that lapis is really hard to sand flush so you should pay attention to the hardness scale if you want to try it. My first attempt was not very clean because I figured I could just sand off the excess. Umm, no that didn’t work. So I had to carefully pour the granules into the engraved recesses, and then I used a small paintbrush to get as much stray material off of the wood. Then put the thin CA glue by drops into the stone areas, and it just wicked and covered it all. And then sand, sand, sand to get it flush with the surface. Lapis is 5.5 on the hardness scale, which didn’t mean anything to me until I learned the hard way that it is half way to diamond so it takes some elbow grease.

I hear that mother of pearl (way lower on the hardness scale) is much easier, and, I would have used that, but I wanted it to stand out from the yellowheart.

PS - For the numbers, I had to grind the lapis granules into dust with a mortar and pestle to get something that would go in those. Still kept the color though!

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That is a very interesting process, and thanks for the tips!

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It ended up looking AWESOME!!

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What a fantastic idea. Another “someone else’s” idea I’m going to use on a future project.

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They are both really gorgeous, and the inlay is amazing! It sounds like you are using Renaissance techniques to do your art. I’ve got a little book translated from Italian and written back then that talks about grinding of lapis to make pigments.

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Ha, I can’t imagine having to do that in large quantities. I’m still feeling the effects (sore shoulders) from the little I did do!

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Love the design on both! The lapis against the yellow heart, wow!!

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Okay so I can attest that mother of pearl is way easier to deal with. I tried it out with this, which will be our personalized ornament this year at Christmas. It’s so pretty, but I really need to find something less ridiculous to use it on. I’m just laughing. Also, kind of proud of the four different wood inlay!

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Wow…your wood inlay looks fantastic . I didn’t realize the size of your ornament until I saw your fingers. :blush:

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Thanks! I took lessons from @evansd2 :slight_smile:

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