My first commission!


#1

Today was a good day. I made my first commissioned sale……for some coasters, no less! I’ve never made even one coaster since I’ve had my Glowforge and it struck me as rather ironic.

I noticed that a small local coffee place here in our town was under new ownership when they posted their new logo on their Facebook page. I dragged the photo of their logo onto my desktop for reference. The image was a botanical drawing of a coffee plant and my first thought was that it would look beautiful engraved on some wood, so I did a Google image search and found it. It was a good high res. image and being in an optimistic frame of mind, I paid $12 for it. If all I lose is 12 bucks, it’s still good. I then replicated their logo to as close as possible without knowing exactly which fonts they had used. I made a coaster-sized engraving on PG cherry, but with a hanging loop on it, in which I put a piece of ribbon.

Last Friday, I drove down to the shop, introduced myself, and handed the engraving to him. I also handed him a card with my contact information on it. I told him I just wanted him to see what I could do and that if he came up with any thoughts or ideas, to please give me a call. He was wowed by the look of the engraving and immediately asked for a quote for 25 of them, but as coasters.

Taa daaaaa! Took the quote to him this morning. This is another new dimension in my Glowforgering!


#2

Outstanding Xabbess!
You had a great idea and grabbed that sucker by the horns.


#3

Whup! That’s it! You’re now a pro! (Congrats on your first sale!) :grinning::balloon::tada::confetti_ball::boom:


#4

Congrats! Great way to go about it. And happy for you to get a decent order for the work you put in.


#5

Great Job! Word of Mouth is going to be your friend :sunglasses:


#6

I love that you just made it happen. That’s awesome!


#7

:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:


#8

Henry Ford probably started just that way. Ha! You go girl!!! :sunglasses:


#9

Commissions really do feel good. Congrats.


#10

Well, aren’t you enterprising! You did a wonderful job on the design and also doing something that I suspect was outside your comfort zone (cold calling). Well done!


#11

Congrats! That looks great!


#12

care to share the quote you gave him along with the cost/profit/time? I’m still unsure of how to price items to sell. I don’t want to overprice, but certainly don’t want to underprice things as well. i have about 10 coasters i got from the dollar store and have a few ideas for some fun quotes on them but have no idea of what to charge for em.

thanks


#13

It looks wonderful! Congrats on your first commission.


#14

I know you know. I remember when you were there, too. :slightly_smiling_face:


#15

Ha! I keep saying you know me. You really do. I had to give myself a little talk before I went calling on him.


#16

Great marketing!


#17

I know what you mean…I’ve never done anything like this before, either. I have a little worksheet that I made for doing some calculating. I’ve done lots of reading online about all the different formulas for calculating this kind of thing and just did the best I could to make myself and my time valuable while not gouging the customer. He’s a very small business…and I’m an even smaller one. I’m thinking I will be able to hone this more as I go along. I wish I could come up with a realistic time for use of the laser tube, but everyone’s is going to be different. I added materials, of course, then a rather arbitrary cost per hour. Was going to charge $20 per hour, for the 11 hours engraving that 25 would take. I didn’t want to choke the guy with a huge cost, so I added on an additional $100. So, 25 coasters for $150. But, then instead of gagging the guy right off the bat with a big number, I told him the cost per coaster, which made it sound a lot more appealing. He ended up ordering using the price per coaster method, and ordered 20 of them, instead. I also gave up $20 profit and offered them to him ‘this time’ for $5 apiece instead of $6.


#18

I don’t think it’s worth fretting over. It’s under warranty and they just posted the manufacturer warranties it for 2 years (I expect that was a misstatement by Support). Regardless, it’s gonna cost something less than $500 or $250/yr. Most likely it’ll last a lot longer. I’d just assume I could cover an extra couple hundred a year and focus more on my time & materials. Someday we might have more info but right now I’d just throw an extra dollar or two per job for the tube and move on.


#19

(Not so far with the Glowforge but…)
I’ve used the following rule of thumb for years:
“What does it cost me to make it? Triple that.”
That doesn’t include the purchase cost of the machine, but it does include materials (including the tiny “Oh I have one of those already” materials), and any shipping/delivery/whatever.
Extremely complicated things (or things I really hate doing) get an up-charge. Extremely simple things (or things I love doing) get a discount

The triple comes from having enough to make one, replace the materials, and a profit to take home


#20

Thanks. I sure agree with that. Too much math can get in my way!