Practical cuts

Aren’t you a wealth of knowledge today :slight_smile:

You would think our pool service would have mentioned these gadgets.

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Thanks, it’s my monthly useful day. :wink:

Maybe not? I mean anything that automates pool maintenance would seem like something they don’t want you to know about :slight_smile:

That being said, who knows, maybe these valves are terrible and they don’t mention them because they are a waste of money? Caveat emptor!

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They work. I had plans to add one to my aquaponic system back before I had a private practice and still had spare daylight hours for playing with such things. :wink:

I also used a more primitive version in my automatic goat-watering setup that kept our goats’ watering trough topped up from the barrel that collected rain from the roof of our storage shed.

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I mean every western style toilet has this built in, it wouldn’t be too hard to rig up with off the shelf stuff from home depot…

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Feed stores have them ready to use without having to kludge anything together. Although for a larger trough, a toilet float would be fine. :slight_smile:

You’ll be able to have one again in Texas. Keeping the fish warm the three days a year it gets cold is doable. I had an indoor one for a while, but couldn’t keep everything balanced. Not enough volume, especially for a beginner.

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Mine is in an outdoor greenhouse. It was awesome when I had it going. I could just break off twigs of things I liked and stick them in the beds, and they’d root and grow. :slight_smile: My housemate / next house owner is super excited about getting it running again.

I used tilapia the first year, then wintered them in the house. I’d probably go with catfish the next time, though.

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I started to dabble in aeroponics a few years back. I might need to start up again.

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I’d prefer catfish.

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Are these fish for eating, or do you have to leave them alone?
Cuz I prefer catfish too - but lightly breaded and sautee’d with some spices - not so much decoratively!

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They provide the nutrients (fertilizer) in the water for the plants.

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That sounds like they have to be left alone - or replaced regularly. This habit might get expensive for me :-/

Koi can live for 30 years or more…

Dozens of species work.

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You can eat them. The goal in the most intensive systems is to produce large quantities of fish and vegetables. The problems come from having to balance the needs of the plants with the needs of the fish.

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A friend in Miami that made an outdoor pool about 8 feet deep and an under sand filter that provided water down a slide that grew slick with moss. A room on one side provided an in wall "fish tank’ effect and a great hidey hole with basic bed etc.

Aside from a plecostomus kissing gouramis and tropical catfish to keep the moss down he had expensive bright colored African Cichlids and Discus that are notoriously hard to breed. The cichlids and discus bred so prolifically that he had to cut the population several times a year to keep it sustainable and had no trouble selling the result, easily paying for the expenses of keeping the pool.

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With tilapia, they reproduce in the system, so you eat them to thin them out. They are very warm water fish, though – can’t overwinter them outdoors, even down south.

Catfish won’t reproduce in the system, so you’d eat them as they get big enough and replace them with new ones to grow out.

@caribis2 have you ever tasted tilapia that came from clean water? They tend to taste like the water they came from; I’ve never had store-bought tilapia that was good. My dad’s a fish farmer, though, and his tilapia are delicious; they have a very mild flavor. :slight_smile: He has a pond he pipes water into from a warm water spring, so he’s been able to over-winter them and keep them going.

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I think I’ve eaten tilapia, but clearly I’m not a tilapia connoisseur. Generally, I prefer stronger tasting fish, but a walleye shore lunch cannot be beat. If I had a source of fresh, quality fish, from say a pond that’s located nearby, I’d eat it a lot more. In SW Wisconsin there are cold water springs cold enough to use for raising arctic char. Sadly, too far away for any sort of regular foraging trips.

While not particularly stronger tasting, a wahoo steak with beurre blanc is the plan for tonight.

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I am hearing that tiger shrimp are an invasive species seriously damaging the St John’s river ecology, but as they grow to the size of small lobsters they sound like I would be interested in reducing the population.

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Whoa we have derailed this topic even more than usual. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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Perhaps a practical design for a tiger shrimp trap?

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