Timelord Hypercube... v1 anyway

Nothing like a New Year and a Tuesday off to motivate you to pick up a project that got left behind.

Hardcore Dr Who fans might recognize this artifact:
Corsair_cube_(TDW)
It’s only in a handful of stories (and two TV episodes), but when I saw it in The Doctor’s Wife I knew I had to have one.

I started with a baseball display cube and some remote LEDs I had on hand, and tried to create the middle piece out of PG white acryic. I was hoping to assemble it without tabs or hinges to give the cleanest possible silhouette, but gluing them into place proved difficult. and led to some alignment issues (you can see extra light escaping at the edges).

Has anyone had any luck compensating for the angled edge when cutting acrylic? Where the cut is wider on the side facing the laser than the opposite side? I think it’s part of what caused my alignment issues.

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So cool. Turned out fantastic.

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Very cool! (And I think @evansd2 does it by flipping alternate panels, which sounds like it would work pretty well.)

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I think most people (myself included) will be too distracted by how awesome it is to notice the seams.

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Impressive!

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Wow … looks great!

If I’m not mistaken, I believe I read somewhere on here, long ago, that the GF focuses on the surface of the material based on the its measurements and or the material thickness you place in the settings for your cuts, engraves etc.

In most cases, this is not an issue, however, as you have found, there are specific applications where this can become an issue. Since the focal point is on the surface, the beam diverges on the opposite side and creates the bevel that you are talking about.

It may be possible to change your material thickness settings so that you place the focal point in the middle of your material (i.e. input a value that is half your actual material thickness).

If my presumption of the GF focusing on the surface is correct, then this should produce a double bevel on the edges of your pieces with its widest point in the middle of the edge. With some design tweaks to make up for the extremely small kerf of the beam, you should be able to get the more controlled fit you are looking for.

Please, anyone more knowledgeable on the GF’s default focal positioning, correct me if I am wrong.

I’ve never watched Dr. Who, but I know a little of it and I think this project looks great!

Looks great. I’m going to have to go back and watch that episode now.

I’m also interested in this concept

I want to try quite a few acrylic projects soon and had no idea about the bevel issue until this post. My ideas involve joining and nesting the acrylic, so that bevel will mess with it a little.