Why is one print so much clearer than the other

Hello. I am not sure if I am asking in correct place. I tried engraving an image I made using an AI software. Both of these images were done on 1/4” plywood and both done using draft photo setting. The one on left is 5 in square and the one on the right is 4.5 in square and that is only difference. I cut both with mask on and then removed the mask and then engraved with no mask. The larger one is way nicer and I’m not sure why they look so different. Any ideas?

Thanks for any help.

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Here is a larger photo of the one on left

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Here is the one that is smaller and not good

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These were not processed in an identical way. Look at this enlarged area from the chins. The poor one on the left and the better one on the right. I don’t think this difference would exist unless the engrave settings were different.

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That is what I thought but when I go back and look at past print it shows me it was draft photo. Am I correct in assuming that when you roll back it will show you the settings you used. Is that right?

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I rolled back to another print and it does show the settings used. So not sure why but both of these show as draft photo. Only difference is the print size itself. I am not sure why they are different.

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If the image has that dithering “baked in” and you shrunk it, the resizing algorithm may have introduced those artifacts. It’s kind of the nature of the beast; you can’t fit 16 pigeons into 15 pigeonholes.

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Thanks for the reply. I don’t know what dithering is, sorry. Is there a way to resize it with no issues? When I downsized it to the smaller size and did draft graphic it looks good. I have since done some painting on it but this is the draft graphic at the smaller size.

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Both look great but obviously there is a big difference in LPI. Draft photo and draft engrave will have different numbers, and HD photo will have smaller dots yet and might look even better though it will take a lot longer time.

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Thank you. I saw that HD photo was going to take forever and opted against it. I have sent a message to support to see why the two draft photos look so different. If I remember correctly, they can look at logs and see if settings were different in any way.

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Yes. It involves turning your raster into a vector - which is definitely doable with this style of art, but you’d likely have to do some hand editing as well.

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Dithering means using dot patterns to simulate shades of grey. Here’s a simple example. Imagine a very simple pattern of 50% black and 50% white, to make a medium grey. Zoomed way in to see the individual pixels, it might look something like this:

image

Now you take that image and want to shrink it to 2/3 of the original size. The simplest way to do that is to remove every third pixel horizontally and vertically, in other words the ones marked in red here:

image

If you look carefully at the remaining pixels after everything is condensed down, you end up with:

image

Instead of a nice smooth “every other dot” pattern, it has clumped together. In this simple example, the end result is still geometrical and even, but you can probably see how resizing a more complex pattern by an arbitrary amount can introduce strange artifacts.

There are different kinds of scaling algorithms with different trade-offs, and that wasn’t necessarily what was happening with your image, but that’s my best attempt at explaining what I was talking about.

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It also looks like they’re different materials? That could also affect the outcome…

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ok thank you. i have resized similar types of images with no issues, so not sure why this one might be different. i did send a message to support but it has been 2 days and not heard back. hopefully soon

they are both on columbia forest maple plywood. i think the one just has a darker part of the maple veneer on that section

At first that was my thinking of what you were talking about and liking that one on that account alone, but as I realized the LPI in dots issue that was what you can control. There is a lot of room for experimenting, especially with the ballance of dots so there are always some but never touching. but LPI should be only limited by your patience.

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