Removing smoke residue from Proofgrade


#21

OK, wow, that’s something.

What magical cloth do you use? Maybe that’s the secret?

Here I was thinking maybe the lemon scent was actually the problem. (Mine’s from OSH, not Safeway, ha.)


#22

Limonene is a great solvent for cutting through all kinds of stuff, I always assumed that’s why. Also because lemons smell fabulous and if you have a tree they’re always falling from the sky.


#23

Just an old face towel…


#24

I’ll have to try lemon juice concentrate, just in case I can lose the sensory attack of ammonia.


#25

The citrus theory may have merit. Lemon juice is hands down the most powerful cleaning agent that I use on my vintage glass products (often too powerful). Similarly, look at how many forum members have reported great success removing smoke using Fast Orange wipes.


#26

Time for more testing. I will try with some old face cloths, for science! I have a bit of d-limonene to try as well thanks to 3d printing supplies. My replacement forge is set to arrive today so hope I will be back in business fast.


#27

I use baby wipes and they work amazingly.


#28

but are they… lemon scented baby wipes? :wink:

I’ve tried windex and didnt quite work, it took a little off but not all.


#29

I apparently don’t have the right kind of baby wipes. Mine do nothing. :frowning:


#30

same


#31

I’m just a week into opening up and using Agni. Reading as much as I can on this amazing resource,

As far as soot residue, I suspect it is a pH effect not citrus - also that oils (and hydrophobic substances) will dissolve the (hydrophobic; carbon) soot better.

This may be of interest

(via https://chicora.org/fire.html)


#32

That’s a bit odd. A pH of 12 is strongly alkaline.
But then a lot of oven cleaners are strongly alkaline, as well.

John :upside_down_face:


#33

Soot is acidic, isn’t it? So the alkaline would neutralize it. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.


#34

Perhaps we shouldn’t try to explain it, just in case we break the magic !
John :upside_down_face:


#35

Not odd. “Ammonia” (really it’s ammonium hydroxide if dissolved in water) is alkaline. Degreasers, oven cleaners are also highly alkaline, lye or sodium (or potassium) hydroxide - that is slightly different process/reaction, the fatty acid (grease) is saponified and converted to sodium salt (same as making soap) and leads to solubilization (in water).

Soot should be mostly hydrocarbons - perhaps the slight detergent in the ammonia helps take that off. I just bought a big jug (smallest I could get). Will check. Now I have to generate soot :slight_smile: So no masking tape then?


#36

This is the Safeway brand…