Very simplistic functionality

See also: soft pretzels (lye)

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Like so many things from the times before refrigeration, temporary abundance, means the wise try to have enough for famine times, Putting the excess fish in the ashes of the fires sounds pretty straight forward. Heck you might even improve the flavor using hickory ashes or something. Using straight lye sounds like a step backwards.

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Good olive trees are everywhere in Southern Arizona as they do very well in that climate. There was a fairly large Nunnery that I passed going to grade school, but after 60 years a lot of things have changed so it might be condos now, but olive trees were there and perhaps a third of all the houses in the area. I now wonder if at sometime in the past they actually collected and processed those olives.

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At least pretzels are yummy.

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Yeah but now I’ll think of Lutefisk everytime… :crazy_face:

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Genius.

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I need to point out Lutefisk, it’s a Norwegian delicacy

If you’re tolerant of off-color content, and want a good laugh, look for “Manx beard club surströmming”… skip to 4:15 for the main event.

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This video makes me laugh really hard every time I see it:

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I was literally in tears laughing at this… :rofl: :joy:

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Me too! every time.

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I even showed it to my husband and I was laughing just as hard the second time. Not many things tickle me like that!

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Whoa! I could almost smell it from here! Not sure how he put it in his mouth.

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I know! It didn’t stay in his mouth long, though.

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Surströmming is a Swedish Baltic herring that is fermented for months. According to another viral challenge by Buzzfeed in 2015, the fish tastes briny and extremely salty. Typically, the fish is eaten with flatbread, potatoes and onion.

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this video is hilarious. like the dark haired kid “you kind of get used to it…”

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Of similar reaction is Durian. If you stay in a hotel in SE Asia that caters more to locals than tourists there will be a sign on the inside of the door pointing out that it is illegal to open a Durian in the room. On the other hand it is an acquired taste that one can like a lot, but that is rarely the first reaction to it. Where other fruit is sold for pennies you can spend $20 to get a good Durian.

Asian markets sell a sugar cracker in many flavors including Durian, that in the crackers is way weaker than the actual fruit. I gave some to a friend to share with her preschool daughter and they took the usual getting used to the idea but when the husband got home from work, his first reaction was that the child had taken a dump on the carpet.

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I’ve tried durian - a prof brought it back from Asia. It certainly smells worse than it tasted. But not half as bad as the corpse flower smelled - https://blogs.cornell.edu/arum/

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In that case it is trying to attract insects that seek dead and rotting animals, I do not know what the Durian’s excuse it.

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I love practical designs like this - awesome!

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There is a species of (tropical?) tree of the Genus Bucida that is a common tree often called olive or olive oak that is no relation to actual olives and a distant relative of oaks that it resembles but does not lose its leaves. I have never seen it as wood but would expect it to be similar (cut branches are light like oak)

Actual Olive wood is available and looking I see @evansd2 was the one who pointed it out.

I have not tried cutting it yet but it is very beautiful :heart_eyes: I am glad to hear it will not burst into flames but I have not yet come up with a design that deserves it. It is supposed to come from ancient olive trees and from what we know about what is happening there the must be quite a lot of such wood about.