360 degree popup story book


#1

I bought my Glowforge to teach students to make props that they can use to tell quick stories. I need to give them some examples, so I made this popup book based on Usuke Oono’s 360 degree books (http://www.awrd.com/portfolios/oonoyusuke). My book tells the story of an intracellular infection, where a host cell picks up a pathogen and the pathogen then grows within the host. You rotate the book and see the progressive stages of the infection. This book shows the course of a Listeria infection.

My idea is the students could carry this around in their pocket, and if then asked what they study, they whip this out and explain their project. This will be much better than drawing pictures in the air with their hands.

The book is cut from bristol board and the cells are highlighted with a water based marker. It is bound using a coptic binding.



#2

Wow! That’s really amazing! Have you made something like this in a more low-tech fashion before, or is this a new art for you?


#3

This is new. I tried plotting data through a 360 book, which was attractive but impossible to read. I would have given up cutting this thing out by hand.


#4

Ooooh! A new technique! That is awesome! :smile:


#5

This is so awesome! What a great learning tool. We have some resident doctors here in the forum that’ll love this :slight_smile:


#6

Now that is just super cool! I’d love to flip through that book. Make more of these!


#7

Very cool.


#8

This is awesome! You inspire me, and I’m willing to bet that your students feel the same. Kudos :slight_smile:


#9

This is just wonderful!


#10

MIND = BLOWN

(Yes $#%*ing Discourse… i meant to say just that)


#11

Great idea, and application of your laser! :sunglasses:


#12

I am blown away! I’ve never seen anything like this. My wife teaches 5th grade science…and she would love this type of thing to help her students learn.


#13

I love the complexity combined with the simple red and green visuals. It’s like a pocket study guide!


#14

Thanks all. What a nice community; I wish you reviewed my research grants.


#15

This is so cool, I’m sure it will inspire your students to study, and think in a whole new way! Your Bristol cuts look really good. May I ask what settings you used? I’m trying to cut it but am having burning issues. Thanks!


#16

WOWZA! This is awesome.


#17

Is that Listeria and actin tails?? Love everything about it!


#18

I apologize for taking so long to respond here. I used a speed of 330 and a power of 42. This gives a reasonably white edge that looks a bit tea stained. There is some smoke that stains wherever the supports were below the paper. I’ve tried slower speeds, and lower powers but this gave a browner edge. I’ve tried a couple of papers and this range works well.


#19

Hey thank you so much! No worries on the delay. I’ve been going the opposite approach, speed 870 strength 86. Quick and strong, which works ok, also has some browning of the paper. to rectify this I’ve been using a piece of frisket film for masking. Once peeled paper is bright white on top, although quite burned in back.

I will give your approach a shot, thanks again!


#20

Whoops, meant 470. :slight_smile: