Aztec Calendar


#1

What do you think?


#2

see nothing. Are you implying they did not have one?

edit: yeah better. I like it


#3

It’s a little hard to read, but I generally like it. (Picture?) :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:


#4

Oh I do like that one…it’s different from the one we all picked up on the internet. Did you draw it? :grinning:


#5

Blindfolded.:see_no_evil:I got it from the net.


#6

Very nice!


#7

Very nice! What’s your plan for it?


#8

Does anyone know how to actually read calendar information from these? (Or the Mayan Sunstone.)


#9

Found this…

https://maya.nmai.si.edu/calendar/maya-calendar-converter

There’s a wiki on how to actually do it too…TLDR. :smile:


#10

That’s good for the glyphs. But the 5 date units (bajtun, etc) that relate to the tracked periods (like our day/month/year/century/millennia) are actually written in a 2 column format.

The daily/monthly versions are interlocking moveable wheels. But I don’t know how the format like this one or the others out there (including my own escutcheon :slightly_smiling_face:) are used as a calendar. Is there some kind of position pointer that sits on top of the circular engrave that tells us “here is today”?

@marmak3261 - do you know from your excursion to Mexico?


#11

One thing to note, the present installation of the large circular stone with many glyphs on it in the museum in Mexico City calls it the sun stone.From what I understand, while it signifies events in time, historical and mythical, and references temporal ideas, thinking of it as a calendar in our sense, or a mechanism to keep track of days, months and years might stray from its purpose, very likely as a a sacrificial altar.

But I might as well say that I know nothing other than what I read at the exhibit.

Not sure at all about the OP’s image here, if it is from another source or an interpretation.


#12

No plans at this time. I just wanted to see how detailed the Glowforge could print. It gets pretty detailed.