Beta Project: More Simple Shapes


#1

Hello again!

Ok, I’ve gone back to making some more simple shapes. Joints are easy peasey when they are 90’s, so I wanted to work out some tougher joints. First I set out to build a octagonal column. Here’s the CAD.

Then I moved on to adding a hip roof to a square tower. Here’s the CAD for that.

I was pleasantly surprised when everything snapped together nicely on the first try.

And that’s that. I need to make an octagonal roof now.


Weekly Highlights for the week of 04-DEC-16
#2

Wow!
I did a few angled pieces for my console project and found them to be very difficult to visualize.
Are you drawing those in Autocad (and did it help)?

My other annoyance with angled joins and finger joints was the gaps left under the tabs, they just bugged me so much that I filled them in with bondo. :slight_smile:


#3

These are really cool. I have some interest in making angled joints as well.


#4

oh dreaming of castles and dollhouses!


#5

@jkopel Yup, used AutoCAD. It helps to draw things in 2D from one view (say front elevation) and then flip it 90 degrees to plan or side elevation with lots of construction lines to keep you honest.

This kind of thing:


#6

Nice! It did not used to do that when I used it (admittedly a long time ago).
I can’t wait to see you finger joint that shape! :smile:


#7

Oh, AutoCAD won’t flip it for you. I got to draw everything, just used construction lines from one view to set my dimensions for other views.


#8

I find that I am bouncing back and forth from ACAD to Fusion 360 to Inkscape all the time. If I can’t figure out an accurate way to make it happen in one, I jump to another.


#9

Fusion 360, eh? I’ll have to look into that. I know Solidworks is kind of the industry standard for mechanical. I’m going to want a decent 3d modeling program for prototyping with a 3D printer, CNC router, etc.


#10

I tried OnShape first, but just couldn’t get used to the interface for some reason. I was able to knock out the same design in Fusion in a few minutes. I’m still not up to speed on the parametrics, but it’s still a very nice piece of free software.


#11

Nice. These are really cool! Love that they just worked on the first try and everything just fit. Man, I need to really learn a 3D program. F360 when I get the new MBP soon. :wink: I’m using illustrator and photoshop, designing only in 2D but concepting in 3D. I am pretty excited about the 3D engraving though! Its working out pretty well so far!


#12


#13

Easy done. Base equal to the size of the octagon segment, height, as tall as you want, tabs: “outies” on one side matching “innies” on the other, copy 7 times, put them together, some trimming required after assembly.

I’m seriously considering buying a second head for my laser, modifying the mirror, and experimenting with cutting on an angle. The GF, with its “consumable” magnetically located head, is at a great advantage, pop the 90° head off put the 45° head on, dovetails here we come. I’m sure a 45°, or variable angle, head is on the drawing board.


#14

With 3D engraving youu could have those edges pre trimmed.


#15

Oh nice!! Always fun to see different shaped things other than the old standby square boxes.:yum:


#16

Looks great! (Out of Likes again.) :relaxed:


#17

Out of likes again too! :+1:

These shapes are awesome!
Just a few more pieces and you can build a Castle! :european_castle:
I knew my drafting class that I took in High School would eventually be useful.

Thanks for posting!


#18

Hey you’re not alone. I’m used to SolidWorks and Pro/E…Onshape was just…I don’t know…I felt like I was making it harder than what it really should’ve been! Glad I’m not alone…though Fusion 360 didn’t load very well on my laptop initially so that left a bad taste in my mouth. I have a friend trying out FreeCad which might be nice (though not as sexy GUI as Fusion or Onshape); however, you have your files forever…no cloud stuff!