Celtic theme bracelet


#1

Made this for my Mum’s birthday, she seemed to like it as she put it on straight away.

Tried these on all the woods and wasn’t even going to try the cherry or walnut, but they turned out the best. They have a nice silvery sheen. Charms are for June, Oak tree and associated animal the wren, plus a triskelion.




#2

Great job, she should love it.


#3

Very pretty! I’ve been playing with some celtic knots lately. :grinning:


#4

Ohhhhhhhhhh … nice!


#5

I hope you have this to help as it is the key read for understanding Celtic knots. Also his son wrote a companion book on the rest of celtic designn.


#6

My sister-in-law is irish and her and my brother just moved back near her family. It’s been great for my nephews. I did some celtic style animals to go on their wedding stationery a few years ago. Been interested since then but I would never presume I know what I’m doing, there is a lot of hidden meanings in them. Met a guy over there who was an expert and had learnt the tradition from a master, really interesting. Don’t think he would be too impressed with my interpretations!!

celtic%20symbols


#7

Oh I’m just messing around with the forms…(and probably butchering them in the process)… I’m sure a full Celt would want to fill me with a few arrowheads. :smile:
(I think there’s some Celtic blood in there on Dad’s side of the family…got the curly Irish hair anyway.)

Those are extremely cool…I haven’t graduated to animal shapes yet. :wink:


#8

Iain Bain’s book is a must-have for creative Knotwork as it was he who first figured out what the artists were doing and why they never made actual knots. His son gets into everything else like the animals


#9

That is beautiful!


#10

Nice


#11

George Bain’s Celtic Art: The Methods of Construction (referenced by @rbtdanforth) is pretty solid.

Aidan Meehan has a series of books each with more limited scope and more procedural construction techniques.

Those are all still in print.

I wish I’d found any of those before I started messing with Celtic knotwork designs. It would have saved some serious wheel re-invention.


#12

The book by Iain Bain (George Bain’s Father) is a more limited scope, sticking with just the knotwork and how it was laid out.

Going through both this afternoon i am reminded of folks my age that were part of inventing the personal computers and what they do and their kids who grew up in an atmosphere drenched in computers and computer language and where they go with those abilities, while at the same time somewhat less cognizant of what it is like for the rest of us to follow . George Bain’s childhood must have been amazing, just as all he lays out is definitely amazing. but he is a bit harder to follow along.


#13

It’s a lovely bracelet!


#14

Of course she liked it! It beautiful and made with passion and love.


#15

This looks great! Awesome job~