CNC design work that may be of interest to some of you


#1

My good friend, Patrick Hood-Daniel (Houston, TX) just uploaded this amazing video of decorative work done using one of his DIY CNC machines. This may provide some inspiration to some of you.

Patrick and I wrote a book together years ago called “Build Your Own CNC” that still sells well. My local makerspace even has the original CNC machine I built for the book using Patrick’s plans in use (with plenty of upgrades).


#2

I actually bought your “Build Your Own CNC” book and made a CNC following the instructionst. I used it for several years before discovering my local makerspace, which had it’s own laser-cutter. My CNC is still sitting in my garage, but I have not touched it since we moved 3 years ago. I need to revive it at some point.

Your book was awesome!


#3

Thanks for sharing that! Patrick and I get emails from lots of folks who built the machine from the book and used it, and it never gets old hearing that it worked well for folks.


#4

I have watched all of Patrick’s videos on YouTube. He’s amazing. Weren’t you in a few of them? I have a lot of the parts needed to make a small CNC. Motors and a tinyG. Just going to do the threaded rods to start and angled aluminum with v-bearings as he has indicated. Now that I have my a Glowforge and it cuts .43" acrylic very well, I’m thinking of using that for the gantry and z axis plates.

This is a cool video you posted. I have a book on the geometry of Islamic decoration and architecture and it’s endless supply of inspiration!


#5

Whoa. That artwork that guy does (as a side job no less) was amazing…


#6

I don’t think I’ve ever been in any of Patrick’s videos. I could be wrong. I’m in Atlanta, and we typically only see each other at Maker Faires. I think it would be awesome to create a mini-CNC using the GF. You’re giving me ideas :slight_smile:


#7

glowforge bootstrap!
Start with the Acrylic and then use the machine to cut Aluminum replacements.


#8

I always wanted to build the Joe’s CNC 2006. I remember that book being out there and people talking about it. The old cnczone DIY forums were a wonderous place back then.


#9

Omg! That bootstrap CNC looks super simple and just a good size. What is the general cost of throwing one together?


#10

Back in 2009 when we wrote the book, we built two (one for the book, one as a spare in case something went wrong). Each was under $800 for MDF, electronics, etc. Today you could probably do it for under $600.


#11

Cool, I have your book as well.
Unfortunately i never got all the parts i needed to get started making it. :frowning:
But i really enjoyed reading your book and picturing myself one day making it.