Cork fabric?


#1

Hey everyone! I’ve been keeping up with the posts and finally made a login. Thanks to all the regulars for all of the awesome information and to @Dan for creating such an amazing machine!

Anyways has anyone ever used/heard of cork fabric? I just came across it online. Seems to be similar to leather. Just looking for some alternatives to leather for the “vegan” folks out there. Not sure if it’s recommended to be laser cut because I’m assuming it is held together with glue?


#2

I have never heard of it before(you learn something every day) but sites mention it having a backing based on application so as well as the possible glue this may be an issue. Best bet, email the cork store and ask them how it is made, if it has any vinyl as the backing then definitely avoid it. Glue could be hassle from residue etc. but probably won’t be harmful


#3

Welcome @cfarrar! That looks like some awesome material!

It might be laser-able. It depends on how the cork fabric is made. I looked around a little and it seems like they bond the cork to a piece of fabric, so it really depends on what they use to bond it. Here is a good description on how its made, and they apparently offer free samples.

http://blog.queork.com/2012/10/how-is-cork-fabric-actually-made.html


#4

Ahh thank you @joe and @Jack ! I guess that’s the problem with a natural material being held together by unnatural material… But definitely could have some potential. Just looking for some alternatives to leather


#5

Hi @cfarrar, you might consider using waxed canvas. I often use it as a stand in for leather and certainly could be laser-ed. I usually wax the canvas after making the project, but I think you could wax before running it through the laser too. I use bees wax and boiled linseed oil to wax (heated to 300 F and then reduced to 200 for application, then heated again to saturate fabric), but you can also buy the fabric already waxed.


#6

Oh thank you! I will certainly be using waxed canvas in the future. I love the look of it and it seems very durable. Do you get your fabric from a certain place? @emilycarolinemiller1


#7

Very cool product i had no idea this existed thank you.


#8

I haven’t used the cork fabric in laser projects but I do use cork tiles that I either engrave directly or cut for the backing for things like coasters and desk objects. The glues that hold the cork together in a cork tile haven’t proven to be especially noxious or corrosive to the machine. They’re a fairly easy and clean cut that makes for a good non-scratching underlayment for projects. There’s also a very flexible cork sheeting available that makes for good thin (1/8"?) coaster backs.


#9

I make my own. I use 100% bees wax and boiled linseed oil (equal parts in weight as opposed to volume) heated to about 200 degrees F. I paint it on with a brush and then melt it into the fibers with a heat gun. I’ve tried several application methods and recipes and this is my favorite.


#10

I am curious, have you have ever cut this on a laser?
It sounds like a useful material for something I want to make, but wax+fabric = wick. I would not want to fill my Glowforge with one big candle. :fire:

I would love to hear your experience.


#11

My first thought :fire:
Fume/smoke is the fuel, and it would take serious airflow to disperse that quickly enough to prevent ignition. From the smoke trails I’ve seen in the videos, there is not nearly enough.
It would probably pronounce combustion.


#12

I haven’t ever cut it in a laser; however, I’d be happy to ship you a sample, as I understand you’re a beta tester.


#13

Unfortunately we’ve asked Josh not to take community requests so he can focus on his own testing.