Engrave or score difference?

What is the difference between engrave and score? There’s cut, score and engrave what is the difference? And I’m talking about using acrylic what would the difference be?

Bitmaps can only be engraved.

If file type allows you to score, it’s a good option if you don’t want to completely fill the area (e.g. doing lettering on signs). If you want to remove the material in the area, engrave is a better choice, and you can choose the LPI (resolution) of the engraving. Scoring is just a score line–faster, but you can’t get as high of quality.

As for how it looks on acrylic, all I can suggest is test for yourself to decide what look you like better if your artwork lets you select.

Engrave and Score do the same thing, but they work on different data types in the SVG file. Vectors (solid lines) can be cut all the way through or scored so they don’t go all the way through. Bitmap data can only be engraved. So “score” is like “engrave” only for vectors not bitmaps.

Score is simply a lower power cut. It follows a defined path using lower power (or higher speed) to mark, vs. cutting thru.

Engraving moves the head back and forth, side to side, either between the edges of a defined path (“Vector engrave”) or varying power or dot pattern based on raster/bitmap image shading.

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An engrave is darkening a filled shape.

Scores and cuts always draw lines. They are the same except that a score is a low-power cut that is intended not to cut through. You have to pay attention, though. If you use the Proofgrade Medium Maple Plywood “score” preset on a piece of paper, it would definitely cut it!

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This is entirely wrong, you might want to check your notes.

25 days ago, a video for people who like those things:

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Perhaps you meant to say that an engrave and score can approach the same effect in the material, but the score is only going to be the width of the beam since it is a a single path vector, in effect a low power cut. Engraving a very fine filled shape can give you a very fine line but it does take a lot longer since it has to sweep back and forth. And if the bitmap you bring in has a very fine line, it will create it, but using a different method.

Yes, that’s what I meant. Score is for vectors, Engrave is for bitmaps. Neither is intended to cut all the way through the material. In that regard they do the same thing.

Engrave works for vectors too. You’re confusing stuff.

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