Framing "canvas" prints?


#1

I’ve got a series of “canvas” (actually some kind of plastic) prints that need to be mounted to frames in order to hang. One of those multi-part, different sized things, like this:

I was planning to use 1x2 furring strips, miter cut and glued/stapled, but wondered if anyone here might have experience with this kind of “artwork” and have different/better suggestions?

fwiw, I was planning to use them “thin” side up, i.e. the canvas would be ~3/4" away from the wall. Just using the “2x” dimension to keep things square, hopefully…


#2

How about a French cleat system?

Add a strip with a 45º to the underside of the existing frame(angled away from the wall), then bevel the top of your furring strip with the 45º angle toward the wall.

Can make both pieces in one cut with a table or radial saw.

EDIT: After re-reading, it looks like you were asking about how to make the frames, not how to hang them. Oops.


#3

Yes, making the frames was my question, but thanks anyway!


#4

I’ve actually done quite a few of these. (The benefit of have a 60" latex printer at work.)

  • Don’t bother with the miter cut. It won’t be visible, and any extra strength it may provide is unnecessary.

  • An air-powered brad nailer & stapler would be tremendously benefical and make quick work of the job. Brads for the frames, staples for the prints. (Glue and staples on the frame should be sufficient, but I couldn’t guarantee it.)

  • A pair of canvas stretching pliers helps to get the print good and tight on the frame. Not strictly necessary, but very helpful. Look for a set like these, not like these. (Notice how the lever cleat on the bottom jaw is set back further on the first pair.)


#5

hmm, if you add a bevel to the top stretcher, you could incorporate the french cleat idea into the frame!


#6

So, are the frames to show, or be hidden behind/underneath?
If they are to show, and you want the canvas to have kind of a nice, floating modern look (like this photo, but with frames), check out Jon Peters Art and Home YouTube channel. He does a lot of really simple paintings, and then makes frames for them. They’re surprisingly easy, but look great!


#7

These will be hidden. I’ve seen plenty of ways to make them, just wondered if our creative community had any tips. Not worrying about the mitered corners is a good one! As is the french cleat for mounting, but two small nails for each panel will suffice, and saves me having to run the stock thru my table saw.

I’ve got electric staple and finish/brad nailers here. My daughter has all my air tools… :slight_smile:


#8

…so you need a new set of air tools.


#9

Despite its source, this nailer/stapler from Horror Fright is a decent performer, especially for the price.

I built several of my stretched-canvas frames with mine.


#10

Good to know, but at the moment I have a Porter Cable 18ga nailer that came with the air compressor and a 23ga Grex.


#11

A 23ga pin nailer is something everyone should have but doesn’t realize it (since most folks have never heard of one). Great for nearly invisible fasteners to hold a piece together while the glue sets.


#12

Absolutely! I’ve learned from watching a few YouTube woodworking channels that glue and pin nails are a great way to build!