How much to sell?

Hey Glowforge members,

Here are the pictures of what I made. I have no experience or idea about how much to sell each frame. Square frame 16" x 16" and rectangle 9" x 16" and 9" x 23" also 1" x 3" wood frame and close up pix on wood frame. How much should I sell?

Thanks, David

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I have no idea on pricing, but I had to say they’re very nice!

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Yep! Very pretty! :slightly_smiling_face:

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Lots of Prior discussions on pricing but the short answer is if you’re not embarrassed your charging too little!

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I have an artistic slant, but I’m not a business man. I have a lot of talents in life but making money has never been one of them. I almost always would undersell anything I did.

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The advice i once got was 3 times your materials cost.

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They are all gorgeous. As presents to friends and family, they would be greatly treasured

However, when selling., one thing I have learned is the need to differentiate from those who mass produce stuff and sell it for less than you can buy the materials. In the right circumstances with folk in love with Quilting they could do better than otherwise, but in designing generally one has to reach farther than going where the software leads, Really beautiful results can be achieved, but those who mass produce stuff will do the same and they can flood far more than you can. Even doing cleaner work with greater perfection will be a lot more work that will not be noticed unless it is extreme and you build a name for that extreme

All that said, I have not found a great answer for myself, and perhaps have pushed too hard trying to push that envelope, and those designs as framed art, boxes, and coasters that anyone seeing that look knows it is you might be the real success plan.

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Those are all beautiful. Telling you what to sell an item for is for hard for anyone to say, everyones story/need/area/expertise/list goes on is very different. One of the biggest factors that you need to think about is what is your time worth? From there you can start to break things down such as how much time did you have to stay with your GF to insure nothing caught fire or messed up, how much was your material, how much time did you invest in making the designs.

When I was working as the lead designer at a graphic shop I always felt bad saying $50/hr, but after the first few times of someone getting a design and then taking it else where for production you learn that your value of time is greater. So really base your cost on what you value everything you put into it personally.

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I price my work at 3 times the material cost plus laser time which I price out at $75 per hour. if I design the print it’s at $75 per hour and if I produce it the I add the above material cost.

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First you need to factor in the cost of your equipment. You can’t be a mechanic without the right tools - It’s something I find the laser community doesn’t include when they have no experience in pricing.

Underpricing laser created items hurts those of us who make our living as makers, artists, craftsmen and purchased the laser as a tool. It’s like training consumers that if something is made with a laser, then it’s supposed to be ‘cheap’ - It benefits EVERYONE who owns a laser to collectively set higher market values for laser created items.

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Lovely work. Best of luck to you when you get things figured out.

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Quick question and don’t overthink it… If no one would question your price, what does your gut tell you to sell them for?

It’s funny becasue I was at the GF FB page and reading the discussion about having to make stuff you don’t enjoy or like, but you do it becasue it will sell to the general masses. It made me cringe and I just couldn’t do it. (I absolutely don’t judge people who want to go that route though and I get wanting to make money. )

Your work is really lovely and it’s hard to price without knowing the market and your intent. I fall on the “making art” side vs appealing to the masses. I tend to under-price things but my attitude has changed a bit after getting brave and putting a $100 price on an item. I was almost embarrassed to say it, but no one batted an eye and after a little customization the buyer handed me $150 saying he felt I was charging too little. It was a good lesson for me and it helped me understand people value my work more when I value it too. :slight_smile: So which do you want to market to; one that wants cheap, handmade products and will go on Etsy searching for the best price or those who would value your work as custom art pieces? I don’t think either market is bad, but I think it helps to know which one your works falls into.

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These are beautiful and are works of art. My wife being a quilter would love them. I do not sell anything so I would not be able to help you there. I will say that if they are priced to cheap, people will not look at them as art.

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I like the display stand!

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I would check on Etsy & see what other people are charging for anything similar. Should give you some ideas.

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Some beautiful pieces … for the right buyer. The right buyer will pay for what they like.

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They look great but I’m ??? on what price them might go for. Nice job, though.

Here’s some food for thought on pricing:

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When selling something made with the laser I set the absolute minimum to be $1 per minute on the laser. From there add in considerations such as amount and cost of material, as well as how much time and labor went into finishing the item (demasking, assembling, etc.) At the end of the day how you value your work as well as how your audience value your work are important factors in pricing. Just never undervalue the quality of a good item uniquely made by your hand! And they ARE quite nice looking!

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