Leather Apple Watch Band

I’m loving the leather work that the Glowforge has afforded me. Here’s a Watch Band design that I’ve put together and am currently wearing. Super comfortable and pretty easy to put together.

Watch Band - Blank.pdf (363.0 KB)

It’s a 2 layer design using Medium PG Leather. There is a captive keeper and a floating keeper. Once dyed, I used a Dremel to sand down the underside of the keepers to make them super thin and pliable. Then I folded them and held them with clamps to retain their shape. After that, I removed the clamps, glued them and clamped them again (this helps to get the folds to have a better shape than just gluing at first). I didn’t take a good picture of this, as I didn’t know I’d be uploading it here.

For the watch straps, place the finished sides out, line the layers up and glue together. I placed leather needles in stitching holes as I clamped to keep the alignment. The long flaps that get folded over need to be sanded thin like the keepers. You can do this either before or after you glue the layers together. I put the Band Bars and the buckle into place, add the captive keeper, then fold, glue, and clamp. When dry, grab your stitching pony, and start stitching! Have pliers (needlenose) handy, as the stitching holes are a bit small, but that makes the stitching look great and keeps it in a straight line.

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Thanks for the file and your excellent write up. I am sure many people will benefit from both. You will get years of service from the band.

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What an excellent share!

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Thanks! I should also mention that this is for the 42/44 mm Apple Watches

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Great job and thanks for sharing the pictures and file. I’ve been wanting to do one for me.

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Looks really nice.

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Magnificent!!! It looks really awesome. Thank you

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Nice! Thanks for the share and info!

FYI, “skiving” is the term for the thinning/beveling the leather layers for gluing together without adding bulk. Using a Dremel is a great trick when you don’t have a skiving blade or machine–or for small pieces/areas!

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Awesome!!! Thank you! Now I know a new tool to look for :slightly_smiling_face:

Oh, have fun doing down this rabbit hole! The tools range from hand held blade tools to industrial level machines. I ended up getting a Scharf-Fix years ago, and recommend that if you want something other than a hand tool…

And for beveling edges of the leather, to give a little more polished look, I really like Palosanto (I’ve only gotten 2 so far)–but prior to getting those, I was (and still am) happy with the tools made in Japan I got from goodsjapan.com.

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Thank you :slightly_smiling_face:

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