Leather burn residue

Hey guys! I have a customer who supplied me with a hide of veg tan leather. I masked it and cut / engraved it. There are a couple places where the masking was either or not pressed against the leather at tight enough or was at the edges between masking sheets where a bit of burn residue got on the leather itself. Just wondering what the recommended solution for removing it is? I suggested ISO but my customer is hesitant to use it on the leather weary of it drying it out. Suggestions?

I have zero experience with leather, but my first instinct would be saddle soap.
I would definitely wait for someone with actual experience to chime in.

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It depends on the type of veg tan you have. Is it completely raw and unfinished or has it been dyed and burnished (like Horween)?

If raw, very fine sandpaper might be sufficient. Burnish the sanded part and area around it with a wood slicker after to blend it back in.

If dyed and burnished then I’d definitely try saddle soap with a q-tip.

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Okay awesome!! It’s raw so I will suggest the fine grit sandpaper with the wood slicker! :slight_smile:

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If it’s more finished, I find that a damp paper towel takes it right off. For raw, yeah that other method sounds better.

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I’ve used both water with cotton balls and alcohol with paper towels. It does dry it out a bit so I’ve started using Neetsfoot oil to rehydrate.

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I usually just use bit of soap on a toothbrush or nail brush & lots of running water. And once the leather dries tape usually gets rid of any excess residue that is more in the grain vs. just the etched areas. But you might be able to get a lot off with just using the tape and not worry about getting the leather wet. I don’t like the idea of using alcohol on any leather myself, but I don’t work with undyed veg tanned.