Make Something: Desktop Perpetual Calendar


#1

Looking good @makesomething!


Branded Coasters & stepping into the unknown
#2

Dang! Had one of these sitting on a Pinterest to do someday and he beat me to it—and made it WAY cooler than I could ever do. Love the quick fix idea of his little inserts for the dates that needed to drop down to the next line.


#3

Thanks! Was a fun project!


#4

Love your work, music video jokes and that you keep the making journey fun and light. I always learn a few things with your video’s and best of all… They inspire me! :grinning:


#5

Yet another great project @makesomething.


#6

Pretty cool! @makesomething you might want to look into fill-in paint sticks the next time you do something like this with engraved text. I think these are the kind we have in the office– they come in a lot of different colors, rub in easily and the excess wipes off cleanly. Seems like it produces a durable result too. I tried the spray paint technique a few times, but our in-house designers pointed me to this and it’s way better.


#7

The dowel/sanding machine trick was genius! I’ll definitely use that one. :thumbsup:t3:


#8

Love the fact that the GF :glowforge: has as common a role in his shop as the table saw and band saw.


#9

And this project goes on the to do list!


#10

Thanks Dean! I didn’t even know these existed!


#11

Yeah, that part was really brilliant.


#12

It really is neat how he works it into the flow just like any other tool.


#13

Great video, keep up the good work!


#14

Oh I felt you on that one.

“So, this is how you spray paint. You use a light stroke, back and forth, and… this spot… Just a little… I mean, a bit extra… COME ON GET IN THEIR STUPID PAINT”


#15

Exactly how it went down!


#16

That reminds me of something I did.
I do cosplay for charity events as part of my local scifi-fantasy convention. I built an Ant-Man costume from the ground up and I wanted a nice chrome paint job on the helmet. I used the Krylon chrome paint. I sprayed everything with a nice black base coat, taped the spots that were to remain black (which took 3-4 hours with a razor and roll of blue tape) and then started spraying the chrome.

Unfortunately, over the course of a few days I went back several times to respray. The majority of the helmet was shiny and chrome and there would be one spot that was slightly rough. So of course I would spray that spot again hoping to have one uniform, shiny, smooth coat.
What I didnt know is that putting the paint on that thick would make the whole thing wrinkle.

I had to strip the whole thing with chemicals and do it all over.


#17

But looking at it now, I bet you have almost a sigh of relief that you put in the work to redo it instead of just “live with it”. It looks SO much better after correcting it.


#18

it does, although i quite like the first attempt, regardless. it could be used to cool effect if you were trying to make a…battle-worn appearance.


#19

Absolutely. I HATED the look and I almost scrapped the whole outfit. I am glad I stuck with it. Found a paint stripper that wouldnt effect the plastic helmet which saved me a LOT of sanding time and a lot of headache


#20

Some paint formulations are specific about adding coats.
Like your result, I was finished the engine bay of my '66 Mustang before I reinstalled the rebuilt engine, and there were a couple of spots that didn’t quite reach perfection. A gloss black Krylon 'professional grade’s spray.

After a few hours drying I redid the areas in question and the result looked like a wrinkle finish! Reading the can (yeah, after the fact) it stated reapply before one hour or after 48.

Like you, #&% sanding and $@#! starting over.