Paper Sculpting

Lately I’ve been obsessed with multi-Layer paper sculpting.

I have some other projects I’ve done on Instagram under @artofeskay



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Very nice! How many layers are those? Very time consuming I’m sure, but they look great!

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these turned out beautiful. Lots of time and energy but they look so cool!

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Most of those are between 12-16 layers, but the thicker version ended up being closer to 40 or so.

Design time took about 2-4 hours depending on the complexity, prep time took about 30 min, cut time about 30 min (as long as everything was prepped properly), I did a dry fit to make sure everything aligned properly and I could finalize the design which took about 30 min, and the final gluing of everything took a the longest at about 2-3 hours (mostly to make sure everything was aligned perfectly)

Now that I have the process down, I can cut a lot of time off of this and I can get a few of these going at the same time.

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Wow - that requires a lot of patience! These are beautiful!

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Very interesting and beautiful.

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can’t believe those are paper! i have done some relatively complex origami (and very simple origami in metal clay) but these are amazing. Congratulations!

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I’m realizing that I need a magnifined glass to work on some of these smaller pieces. Also ended up needing to resort to tweezers to handle the pieces so I don’t glue the pieces to my fingers and can line them up properly.

Here are some additional pictures of some of the dry fit process with some of the smaller parts.




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Whoa, that increases the difficultly. Very cool artwork.

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That’s a real labor of love. I didn’t realize that they were so small.

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Definitely more time-consuming than I have the patience for!

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These are quite nice. How much paper did you use for the snowflake(?)

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1 sheet of 11x17" paper. I had them set at being a 6" piece origionally but I would have had to go through multiple pages and for a test piece I decided to keep the material use rather limited, so I ended up making them 4" instead so I could fit more layers on a sheet. Now that I have a lot more of the details ironed out, I can make them much bigger, but it will go through a lot more material because of it being multiple layers.

Also, because I enjoy torturing myself and seeing what kind of detail I can get out of the kerf and the required power to cut through the piece.

This all used up about 1/2 sheet of 11x17" paper


This one was just a test to see what kind of scale I could operate at with some of the details. This was the second go around after realizing that 2/3 of this scale would just burn and not cut any more.

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Oh, shoot I thought you were talking about another snowflake I made that I didn’t post on here. The one I did post was about 2 sheets of 11x17"

This is the one I was mentioning earlier.

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Beautiful work! Paper is an incredible medium.

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These are beautiful!
What weight paper do you use…regular copy paper, cardstock?

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Really nice!
Did you use Engrave or Cut for the operations?
How did you hold the paper down?

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Thanks! I use the cheapest poster board I could find at the store. Since this is still a learning experience, I figured I’d learn on the cheap at around $2 per sheet. (22"x28" which if you cut them down properly into 11"x17" sheets, you can get 3 sheets worth.)

I also found that this stock ends up being 0.0125" per sheet. (important for me because I need to know how tall the final piece will end up being with each layer.)

It leaves a brown stain on the edges because the white has a “sheen” on it, but like I said, it’s all about learning more so than the polished look.

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I use cut for these. I was trying to use plain copy paper, but the fan pressure is too high. When I use posterboard, I was originally using magnets to hold the edges down, but found I don’t need to do any hold down on them because the pressure isn’t high enough to make the pieces go anywhere.

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Here is an updated version of the star I did previously to try and show some more of the scale. The hardest part is not loosing the piece in the grate when cutting it…



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