Plant Markers for the herb garden

I made these plant markers for our new herb garden. About 8" long by 1" wide on 1/8" birch. I tried a few different looks and ended up liking the letter cut out the best, it’s also the fastest.
They are relatively quick to make and the plants have enough turnaround that I didn’t varnish the wood, we’ll see how long it lasts with the usual watering and all.

Here are my proofs and settings (though as usual do a test on your own material and machine):

  • Material: 1/8" Birch plywood - untreated
  • Cut: 150/full
  • Score: 125/3
  • Engrave: 1000/90

I also made a video about the process, check it out here:

I’m using Cuttle.xyz for the design and here is a link to this same project if you want to make your own, you can change the plant names and font quite easily. :smiley: :herb: :ear_of_rice:

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Looks like you are running out of thyme.

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I really like the cutout ones—they are so easy to read. I think they’d be great in a stencil font like Neoneon.

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If they’re like mine, they’ll be surprisingly short-lived. :frowning:

If I were going to remake them I’d use acrylic I think.

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I have seen other post where people coat them in bees wax to keep the water out

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Moved to BTM since you (helpfully!) posted settings.

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These look great!

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I might have to try that—much of the wooden things I’ve made that make contact with the ground have rotted away, even those with finish added.

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I will second the acrylic usage for outdoor projects! It has been holding up surprisingly well in the elements!

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Neat project! For durability it’s hard to top stone, and slate engraves nicely.

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I especially like the composition of the first photo, where thyme is on our side…

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Ooh I like that idea! I’ll try a couple. The beeswax has a bonus of being compostable/biodegradable. Sometimes I put small leftover pieces of untreated wood in the compost, also where I live they allow you to put unpainted wood in the garden waste bins so beeswax would be fine for their end of life. Thanks for the suggestion!

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One of those rare moments :wink:

Why not tile instead? Just need to figure out a mounting system: corrosion-resistant wire loop epoxied to the back?

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Good idea! The set I bought were suspended by a stainless rod like is pictured. The curl at the top of the rod is tight enough that the tile has to be slipped on from the bottom before you stick it in the ground, it won’t go on or come off from the top.

I like how the slate is held, but a person would have to have a tile bit and some patience to create the same. Being a former jeweler, I designed a few solder-free solutions for small tiles (in my mind; vanity projects), then went with um, jeweler’s adhesive.

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Nice!

I made plant markers out of the neon green acrylic last year – they show up amazingly well in the garden. Unfortunately my dogs think I put them out there as canine entertainment, so they ended up scattered all over the yard instead of in the garden beds where I wanted them. :roll_eyes:

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I kept trying to figure out what REGAN was LOL! Little slow tonight :rofl:

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Was wondering the same thing when I first saw the post a few days ago. Guessed it was something obscure since my understanding of herbs and spices is almost non-existent. Wasn’t until you commented that I went back and stared at it awhile. Thought there might be significance in the two blank spots on either side of regan but it still took me about a minute.

Oh, so that’s why stencil fonts were invented.

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LOL, yeah as @rpegg says that’s why stencil fonts where invented.
Though it’s funny, the other people that keep the garden didn’t see the missing letters. Maybe it works like that tapping test that exemplifies the curse of knowledge. If you know it you see it, if you don’t know it you can’t see it.

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