Quick leather backing experiment

Someone else was asking about how to deal with leather fuzz on the backside of leather. As a quick experiment I bonded some black pigskin suede bag liner to the back of some veg tanned leather with barge cement (msds states combustion decomp as CO and CO2). Let it dry for a full day to make sure there are no flammable solvent vapors (and don’t use to much on the liner side or it will bleed through). Cuts great, and the back is finished. I masked with meduim tack tape, and applied antique stain and sealer before stitching.


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Wow! Gorgeous!

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What she said! That’s an awesome design! :sunglasses:

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Beautiful piece of work.
:upside_down_face:

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Wow!:+1::glowforge::grin:

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wow

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Dang. That looks fantastic!

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Just as an aside, Tanner’s bond contact cement works great also and, should be laser safe as long as it’s fully dry and cured (no solvent vapors near the laser please). Decomposes to CO and CO2 as well (according to msds).

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Eloquent solution! :sunglasses:

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Do you know what the tannage is on the pigskin suede? I’m guessing it’s chrome tanned, which puts off carcinogenic smoke. Better to check than breathe that stuff.

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The pigskin was chrome free.

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Wonderful! That should save a lot of steps.

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Oh, brilliant! I’ll check that out the next time I’m there. Thanks for sharing this–it’s going to save me a ton of time.

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My kinda project! Very nice.

Wow. Wonderful. Thanks for sharing

Great solution! Such a nice, clean finish.

For those who come searching here for info, I’ll add my 2cents about gluing leather. I glued some pretty fine, detailed leather appliques to a dog collar using “Weldwood contact cement” non-flammable formula with great success. (It’s the version that comes in a green can.) The collars were worn by hunting dogs who gave them lots of abuse and the appliques never budged.

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Whoa! This looks great!

Wow … great job!