Resizing designs

I took advantage of the holiday sales to get some nice designs. I liked this sleigh and reindeer set - from VectorFilesCNC. He still has some nice sales going on if you’re interested. There was a little file issue which was promptly corrected and it also started an avalanche of free files as well - some of which very nice and usable. [no, he didn’t ask me to post this…]

I did end up resizing this file - so I finally learned to resize a file to the material you want to use - the easy way!

  1. Ungroup the pieces.
  2. copy one tab hole and move outside of the rest of the file.
  3. measure the height of the tab. For use with 1/8"ply, it needs to be 0.125".
  4. If it is not, group the file back together, switch the measurement to % and increase/decrease the pieces all at once, until the tab height is correct.

In that same vein I’ve been wondering how to convert a Illustrator file to an Inkscape file, seeing how they come out as different sizes depending how you upload them - this is due to Illustrator routinely being set to export as 72 dpi and Inkscape to 96 (I think).
So while I was getting comfortable with resizing, I used a pdf and svg file from @designvh619 's etsy shop (I’m a fan - and no, he didn’t ask me either) and pulled them both into Inkscape. I knew the pdf would be the correct size, but the svg would not be (if you pull it directly into the GFUI it will be ok though). So the conversion rate is to increase the entire file by 125% and you’ll have the exact size! This should work for all svg files you suspect are made in Illustrator and come out too small/not fitting properly after you opened them in Inkscape.

And while we are here… this article on Cartonus also seems to be useful: https://cartonus.com/resize-projects-of-laser-cut-for-different-material-thickness/

18 Likes

There is a slightly more precise way to do this in inkscape (and probably others):

4 Likes

Thanks, @evansd2! I figured you would pipe in if there was an easier way - you or… @rbtdanforth.
:wink:

3 Likes

You can do it via percentages too, you would just divide the desired slot thickness by the current slot thickness, and multiply by 100.

So if you want you slots to be 0.125” and they are currently 0.115”, you do 0.125/0.115*100 = 108.7%

Make sense? Nothing a minute with a calculator can’t help with :slight_smile:

5 Likes

From a while back…

2 Likes

Hmmmm… I think that does make sense!

Love the swirly reindeer! :grinning:

3 Likes

I successfully used your method today!!! Much quicker then guessing till you get there… :crazy_face:

2 Likes