Woodworking question: Rounding the sharp edges of wood

I have this thicker piece of wood that I would love to have even smooth rounded edges. What tool would be the best to do this? A router? If so how would I do it?
Thank you!

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By hand would always work, but a router or a Dremel would make it go WAY faster.
I’d set the Dremel in a vice at the angle you want removed - then put the wood on a flat surface the height of the Dremel head so you can just push it into the grinding wheel. There are machines built specifically for this, but I don’t have one so I improvise :slight_smile:

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There’s a router adapter for the dremel that helps with that.

I’d use the Dremel to roughly shape it and remove material. Then go to hand sanding with a block.

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Well, if you really want to get into woodworking along with the GF, a router with an edge-forming bit would be your best bet. If you know someone that has a router table that could be done in just a few minutes then a light sanding with some Micro-Mesh abrasive pads to really smooth it out… If you want to round the edge I wouldn’t use a sanding block, you will want something that will form to the edge want…

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With proper blocks and hand skills you can get a very even rounded edge by hand.

It’s difficult to justify the expense and space needed for a router table for a single project. Heck you don’t even need a Dremel, it just speeds things up.

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That is why I stated, if you really want to get into woodworking along with the GF, a router with an edge-forming bit would be your best bet. If you know someone that has a router table that could be done in just a few minutes then a light sanding with some Micro-Mesh abrasive pads to really smooth it out."

Didn’t read where he said this was going to a single project. However, he could create many projects and sell them, then the expense for a router and table would be worth it in the long term. That’s where what I said about really wanting to get into woodworking along with the GF,

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others have suggested a router table. not knowing your tool status I just wanted to pass this along. I have a large table saw, and I mounted my router lift system in the wing of the table saw. that way I have a large surface. I can use the fence from the table saw as the fence on the router and not add anything to the footprint of my shop. which already has my big feet in it. so anything that takes up floor space I have to really want and find useful. :slight_smile:

so while you might not have a table saw now, you might some day. I use my table saw to cut down cardboard and the sheet mdf and plywood that goes into my 'forge.

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I have found sandpaper and wood files quite excellent. For many years I have found that other folks preference for machines often counter productive as they have trouble getting an even finish and spend often more time than the files, or they go so fast it is hard to control and spend the extra time fixing those. A belt sander for large areas needed to be flattened and rarely an electric tool for roughing out, but even my belt sander is 400 grit.

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vaguely related, i just picked up the plunge router i paid for a month ago when woodcraft had a sale. so many people bought it, it took that long to get enough in stock to fill the orders. not specifically for the GF, plan on building a mantel some time in the next couple of months. but maybe it’ll get some GF related work done too.

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Mahalo @deirdrebeth @evansd2 @rbtdanforth @ca_worth @gamn1958 @shop

I do want to get into woodworking, but have no space to do it… i do have a table saw, so I am interested in how to convert it into a routing table, and I like all of the hacks.

I thought about laser building a box for my dremel to create my own routing table after reading all of these posts, then I spoke to my father who apparently has owned and never used such a table and router since before I was born. So now it is in our house next to the piano and I need to find the right bit, and figure out how to use it. :slight_smile:

Thank you so much everyone for sharing your wonderful insights and tips. This is an amazing community.

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That’s me :laughing: I have a table that’s been in the shed for as long as I remember. And two full size routers I have almost never used. But I also have a small finish router that I use fairly frequently. Very handy.

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something like this. you’d need to cut the saw table wing and route in a notch to set the lift in.

I have a Jess M router lift. dunno if they even make those any more.

well silly me… turns out they do still exist. :slight_smile:

I have the much earlier version of this one. As I have had mine for over 15 years

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I have one that looks like this but from Lowes, I think. Anyway it was in the back with the humidity and locked up solid before I got to use it, It is small 1’x2’ and mostly plastic so I was going to add a regular router for where the old one died. I have a real problem with tools as I never planned to do that much woodwork thinking I could laser and done, but that is not how things worked out. A big advantage in using hand tools is that they do fit in a much smaller space.

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This what I have, with router and bits about $500. Sits right on top on my work bench and easy enough to move if you need the room on your bench.

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I never wanted a router table and now I have a dozen tabs open with potential purchases. I think all I really need is the little Dremel attachment, but I’m really tempted by that Bosch. I just don’t have any room in my small garage for tools.

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Before I had my shop built I used mine on a Dewalt Folding Table on my patio… Not the ide solution but it worked for about a year…

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Two thoughts…

  1. A trim router with a 1/16" round-over bit will get the job done for a fraction of the price of a router + router table. Clamp it upside down (bit up) and use the base plate as the “table.”

  2. Hard to tell from the photo, but if you are using plywood, keep in mind that the core is going to be exposed regardless of the rounding method, but hand sanding removes the least material.

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A trim router is great, but if he is going to get into woodworking the router and table is the best investment. He can trim as little as he wants by using a guide and fence.

As for the plywood edges, I use the same veneer as the plywood, cut it a little bigger than the side then glue it. I then trim with a Laminate Trim Router Bit, if you go slow and easy looks great…

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To really get into woodworking having to think about a place for a router table will be quite minor compared to thinking about a place for everything else! and most of the wood cut will be in excess of a half inch. I would need a garage/shop with living quarters rather than the reverse.

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I’d get a dremel and the following things. Will always come in useful for future projects

https://www.amazon.com/Dremel-231-Shaper-Router-Table/dp/B0000302Y9/ref=sr_1_5?dchild=1&gclid=Cj0KCQjwmcWDBhCOARIsALgJ2Qe18aFgvsSQXPnUz9t5vq5FaOrUfd4ZY-dCvNeiVMrnGdey_nIdARcaAuusEALw_wcB&hvadid=409946503585&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9030252&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=16110275477661583081&hvtargid=kwd-176422599&hydadcr=1614_11255930&keywords=dremel+router+base&qid=1618074619&sr=8-5

https://www.amazon.com/Dremel-615-Piloted-Rounding-Routing/dp/B00004UDIJ/ref=sr_1_2?crid=1VJLZHJAVDPQI&dchild=1&keywords=dremel+roundover+bit&qid=1618074697&sprefix=dremel+roundover%2Caps%2C208&sr=8-2

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