Acrylic Lifter Pins You Can Cut From Scraps

Here are two files for making acrylic lifter pins to keep your acrylic raised .30mm off of your crumb tray. You can cut these little pins from scrap wood you already have laying around!

Raising the acrylic up off of your crumb tray a bit will prevent flashback burns on the bottom of your acrylic as you cut it. Crumb tray holes vary in size and there are two files for the pins. One with a thinner stem and one with a slightly wider stem.

My crumb tray takes the thinner stem and I sand the stem a bit with a nail file to get a perfect fit.


ACRYLIC_RISER_PIN_REGSTEM
ACRYLIC_RISER_PIN_THINSTEM

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That’s an interesting idea.

Why did you go with a slot instead of a shelf? Seems like if it were just a shelf you could lay your material right on the pins without it being quite so tricky to setup. Do the slots help in some way that I’m not anticipating?

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I can see using slotted and non-slotted so you have edge and mid-panel support.

I like this idea!

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i’m guessing that holds the acrylic in place. if you just rest on top, then it could get “nudged” out of position. especially if you’re testing for cut through where something might not have fallen, but is just connected by masking.

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Interesting idea. Yeah some sort of teeth to hold it firmly would probably be good.

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Thank you. I will give these a try soon.

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Thank You! I will have to try them too. One thing to remember is to make sure you cut holes first so the piece does NOT drop down before hole cuts are made.

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Wouldn’t you want the smaller cutouts to happen first and the final object edge cut to happen last so the acrylic piece doesn’t drop down to the crumb tray before all the other cuts, scores or engraves have happened?

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Depending on the size of the acrylic, you might need braces under it to hold it up so it doesn’t bow down too, right?

I usually just place scraps under the acrylic and use my normal pins to hold it all down.

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Yes, that is what I was trying to say but you said it clearly. :slight_smile:

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Always thought there should be mire discussion about lifting materials, but masking is always key to avoid flashback. Maybe lifting is more sustainable. Saves tape…

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:kissing_heart: Thank you how did you know I needed these?

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Very nice share, thank you! I wonder if this would work for wood too? I usually use dish soap or wood glue (dried) on my acrylic, but I always want to mask the wood.

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Fun!

I started to model something like that for 3D printing recently, based on seeing these:

… but, have not yet finished the model.

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A laser supply company i recently signed up to be a member with (like trotec, i needed a member login to order), sent me a welcome gift of a paper honeycomb tray they make. It is supposed to help prevent flashback. I haven’t used it yet. I think it was too high for glowforge clearance in the honey comb tray.

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That is what I like the most of this forum, it is full of creative people that constantly contribute to the wealth of knowledge in it.
thanks @jennifer.l.huber for your generous contribution.

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@CMadok maybe you can use it without the crumb tray? A picture would be helpful.

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I apologize, it’s somewhere-I don’t know where I put it. I honestly haven’t looked at it since receiving it. But this is it:

70726f647563742f72656e6577616c2f66756e656e7368692f66756e656e7368692d6869726f67652e6a706700313530000074006669745f686569676874

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Nice share, but it appears you’ve reversed the dimension callouts in the photo…

I’m also confused how the design shared would raise the acrylic by “.30mm” when the actual dimension of that portion of your design is 8.0mm tall. What am I missing? 8mm is .315 inches – perhaps that’s it?

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If the honeycomb is made of paper, wouldn’t the laser just cut through it and destroy it, or am I misunderstanding something?

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