Beta Project - Ravioli Roller!

beta_project

#1

First and foremost, thanks to @iliketomakestuff for the inspiration!

I decided to make my own, all laser cut of course! No glue, all press-fit, made out of 1/8" maple. I decided to use two layers of wood for all segments and used that fact to add a crimping element, to better seal the pasta!

(I broke some of the points off as I was pressing everything together)

And then it just so happened that a friend brought over some pasta, specifically to make ravioli!


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#2

nice work! Making me hungry though :slight_smile:


#3

Oh my. This keeps getting better and better.


#4

Wow. I really like the double layer for the crimps. Way to step it up a level.


#5

Interesting sealing mechanism, I like it!


#6

Super fantastic idea about the crimping…great job! :clap: :+1:


#7

that is a great idea, and what time is dinner?


#8

Really nice mechanism :spaghetti: but be careful with the materials. I don`t know what wood you use but most of woods contains glues and toxics additions. Is not recommended to use this materials with food.


#9

He mentioned that it’s all press fit with solid maple, so he should be fine there.

I am curious though, @chadmart1076, if you used any finish on it. I still haven’t found a food-safe, resilient finish that I really like.


#10

Just a lily-gilding suggestion: find some mylar or delrin or something similar and zappable about 10-20 mils thick. Make disks and strips that you can sandwich between the crimp layers for clean cutting. Yum.


#11

Nice job!


#12

Absolutely brilliant idea for dealing with the crimps and I am totally going to steal your idea for mine. Also nice work with make it all in one with no glueup or wooden dowel.


#13

Yes! the mechanism is press-fit, but the problem might be the wood used. Most of the woods contains glues and toxics additions. Ind addition, as we can see, the corner of the wood is burned ( this happens with all the organic material that we use for laser cutting) and is the part of the mechanism that is in contact with the food, this is not very recomendable. I attorney to use non-organic materials that are fit for use with food.


#14

Not sure what you mean. Yes burned organics are not great for you, but we directly do this during cooking (BBQ, cooking salmon on cedar planks, kebab on wooden skewers, frying, etc) so plain wood which has been laser cut is not likely worse than any other means of hot wood/food, now I do agree that the glues in plywood, etc are likely way, way worse for you as their decomposition products are likely unpredictable…


#15

Yeah! Well done :slight_smile:


#16

Sorry, I know that my english is not the best and it is not easy for me to explain in english this kind of things.
Obviously it is not the same to make a BBQ with wood that is made for cooking or touch directly the food with the burned wood that contains glues and toxic agregateds.


#17

Although that’s not so awesome for you either (anthrocycluines, etc). My point was just the baseline isn’t so good for you either, and when assessing risk it’s important to understand how different is the risk of the new thing versus the risk of the usual thing.

I got questioned about a 3D printed medical device I created that is about to undergo a clinical trial, by the IRB at the hospital about how the risk of the device shifting during surgery was going to be, and I said x% based on my testing in simulations, and they said “wow that seems higher than we expected” I then pointed out that the baseline was a piece of adhesive tape and a rolled up towel…


#18

We agree, BBQ is not the most aseptic way to cook :wink: but in this case the baseline is the metalic ravioli roller machine certificated for food manipulation. The intention with my first comment was to alert that the material used could be not the best for food manipulation.
I think that the machine is awesome and very usefull, but personally I think the material used is not the best, I personally advise in this case “food friendly” methacrylate.

P.D.: I hope you the best with your 3D printed medical device. 3d printing is a blessing for the medical world. :clap::+1::ok_hand::muscle:


#19

This surge of ravioli makers is so much better then the smallest laser thing of last week! Great job.


#20

Aseptic is a different problem (ability to be bacteria free). I was just commenting that any “cooked” wood (or other organic) is actually pretty nasty, we’ve all just accepted that risk since caveman times that cooking is safer… But anything that is charred (which is likely aseptic) is toxic at some level.