Butter Lid

I have a cute little bowl that I use to store my butter on the counter, but it has no cover. I was using a tiny tiny plate to cover it, but trying to balance the butter knife on top was a pain, and the plate/lid would slide all around.

So I made myself a butter lid! 2 pieces of Proofgrade, with one cut into two circles so I could have a top rim and a bottom ledge. Whelp, even though I used calipers, the inside circle was just a tad large (I blame the inner angle on this hand-made ceramic!), so I used my tiny jeweler files to take the extra off until it fit snuggly! Now it fits, and the top rim makes it a great place to rest the butter knife.


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Excellent practical cut.

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Thank you! Since home made bread is probably 50% of my food intake, it cuts out a lot of mild irritation of having to deal with an annoyance, and instead, replaces it with a delight to use something that I’ve made.

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Pretty smart. The overage may be due to kerf?

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That’s a great :glowforge: solution. Cute design and a good fit, even if you did have to sand a little. Looks like yummy homemade bread too.

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I love it! Will the wood get knarly after awhile from moisture? If so, you could always do one in acrylic.

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That is a cute bowl. Nice solve!

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If the lid was loose, I’d agree with kerf being the culprit. But it turns out that the hand made-ness means the rim is not perfectly circular, and the inner slope is slightly different all the way around. Hard to explain without a cut-away diagram :sweat_smile::joy_cat:

@cynd11 , I have no idea if the relative butter humidity will have much of an effect over time, and it is at least partially sealed already since it Proofgrade. I could see hitting the unsealed bits with mineral oil though! And if it gets ick, like you said, I can always make another :heart_eyes_cat:

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Thank you! I hardly even want to call it a bowl – it is closer to a sake cup. It has the cutest little foot that I totally missed capturing in my pics!

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This is so cute and so practical!!

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That’s Smooth!

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Thank you @rvogt and @Thumper369! I was tempted to go with “Butter my butt and call me a biscuit”, but it didn’t fit very well in context :joy_cat:

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Lovely practical cut. It’s little things like this that make the daily happiness quotient go up.

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I thought it was “I am on a roll! That is why I have butter on my pants!” :wink:

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If I don’t quit breaking my glass lids on my jars, I’m going to have to do the same thing! That looks great!

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By the way, that looks like some pretty awesome bread with that lid :smiley:

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Thanks! I’ve been making bread nearly twice a week for at least a year now, and I’m still learning every time. Super simple recipe, just 460 g flour, 2 tsp salt 2 tsp yeast, and just about 1.5 cups water. It astonishes me how proofing the yeast can give you a different taste, rising 2 or 3 times a more sour dough flavor/texture, or, now that it is getting warmer, forgetting it and letting it rise too much before sticking it in the oven can give you very large, 2" tall airy bread :sweat_smile::joy_cat::joy_cat:

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Looks like your practice is paying off. My daughter makes bread every other day. It’s definitely a talent learned over time!

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I make bread a couple times a week also. I used 2 1/2 cups white flour, 1 cup wheat flour, 1 1/2 tsps salt, 2 1/4 tsp yeast, 1/3 cup yogurt, 2 tblsp sugar, and 1 cup water. I found the yogurt helps it not dry out as much. And I finally realized if I rolled it out before I formed the loaf after the first rise, my texture turned out a lot better. I had been just punching it down and forming it into a loaf. :roll_eyes: Think I started that when I started making “artisan style” bread using a banneton proofing bowl, but I went back to the regular loafs because they’re easier for sandwiches. Now I just use the proofing bowl when I want to make bread for garlic toast, etc.

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Nice! My spouse can’t handle whole wheat, although when I was growing up, we would grind our own wheat and make the bread the same day! Adding any whole wheat makes a different beast altogether :joy_cat:

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