Easy Kerf Gauges

Boring, but really useful. Cut them out of the material you want to check. Slot you material into the slots to find the right size and you already have your kerf allowance!

The dimensions are correct in the drawing program, but the actual cut sizes will vary according to the kerf of the cut. So if you are looking for a tight fit, just try the slots until you find one that is tight. That is the dimensions you need to use in your drawing program.!

Kerf_Gauge_Thickness Kerf_Gauge_Circles

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Brilliant, simple solution to a very common problem!

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A great Idea! :star_struck::star_struck:

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This is a fantastic tool…thank you so much! I’m slowly learning how to use kerf better, but this will really help me. I’ll need to convert to inches though, as that’s the unit I use to design in Affinity.

and PS…this is not boring at all to me…it’s exciting

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This is clever. I was working on a festi tabbed box the other day and getting the thickness and burn worked out was a challenge. I learned a lot about how a little adjustment does make a difference. And then to remember that power and speed do affect the resulting kerf.

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Yes, I should have said that the gauge is only valid for one speed/power setting. Since I tend to use the same every time on a particular material I’d forgotten to say.

Also, not my idea, I think it’s been around for decades with woodworkers.

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Cool solution, I like how you did the numbering on the second one. Thanks for sharing!

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I love seeing peoples different takes on kerfinators :tm: this is a nice one. I need to get around and do a better one for my Fusion 360 workflow.

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Thanks! A very helpful file.

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If I could hug you through the internets, I would. I’m going to print this for sure and give it a go

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Also, apparently medium PG clear acrylic is thinner than 2.75mm, crazy.

Yes, I discovered our UK sourced 3mm is the same just this morning. I will have to redo the gauge for acrylic.

I shall have to test my 5mm as well. I made it 3 and 5mm because that’s what I buy acrylic in.

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Very nice! I have a question: is it kerf adjusted? For what material?

:smile:

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OK, this looks so cool and useful so I’m going to embarrass myself and admit I don’t understand exactly how to use it. :upside_down_face:

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No no, that’s the whole beauty of this.

  1. Cut this gauge in your chosen material at the power and speed settings you will use.
  2. Take the gauge and material and see which size fits.
  3. That dimension you use in your drawing program for any slots.

In other words the drawing is exact, the physical gauge has been cut so includes the kerf, so when you measure you are automatically including the kerf and it will tell you the drawing dimension.

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Great idea. Thanks for the share!

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Oh, I see! I have to admit I skimmed over your first post so I didn’t catch that. Thanks for clarifying!

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Genius!

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Even if your document is set to use inches you can still type any unit into AD. Just be sure to include the unit. It will convert it for you. (So while editing the size of an object if you type “2.54mm” as the length of something it will convert it to 0.1in for you if your document units are set to inches.)

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I knew it would convert units…I have done it before, but for whatever reason my brain just didn’t apply it to this use case. Thanks, Tim! Now, I have learned at least one new thing for today.

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