Engraving from sketch in Onshape

I am using Onshape to create a DXF, then InkScape to make an SVG from this. This works fine for cutting and scoring. (Just importing the DXF into Glowforge does not give correct scaling, but that is not my question.) I wish to engrave areas between lines, such as this: The left is the sketch imported from Onshape. The right is the way I want the engraving to look. Is this possible to do? Please let me know the steps I need to do in InkScape, if you have tried this. Thanks!
image

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I don’t use Inkscape, but this is simply a matter of using a ‘fill’ in the areas you want engraved. The ‘black’ sections must be raster / bitmap images in order to engrave them.

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I like keeping everything vectors so I can scale it or whatever. Also fewer choices to make when engraving :smiley:

I created something similar to the OP’s art in Adobe Illustrator. The process should be similar in Inkscape but I don’t know the exact commands.

Subtract the alternate rectangles from the next larger one (so if we number 4 as largest to 1 smallest rectangles I’d subtract 3 from 4, and 1 from 2) to create compound paths, then I’d join the two compound paths to make a single compound path with the 2 filled areas.

This is the result.

Compound-Path-Example

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I highly recommend that you look into Kiri:Moto as and add on to onshape. You can convert to SVGs a bit more reliably. Of course you still have to edit the SVG to make compound paths and fills. .

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Doing a fill in InkScape works. I tried making compound paths, but the Glowforge did not burn anything. It scanned over the material as it was engraving, but all was white. So I will use the fill and then remove the paths that came from the DXF. I briefly tried Kiri Moto. It created an artefact in a corner where the tool jumps to the next path. This must be to avoid over-burning start and end points, but it messes up the fill. Anyway, thanks for your answers. I will experiment further.

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just hatch it

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Not true, but rasterizing solves many weird issues if they arise.

This usually means there are multiple vector filled shapes on top of each other in the file - they cancel each other out when the GF processes the file. It’s easy to do when creating compound shapes.

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I had this happen to some early engraves I made, based on EPS font files. Turned out there were several layers selected at the same time (see @ekla 's comment above), so nothing engraved. The only way I could rescue it was to click once on a thing to engrave, and use the arrow keys to move it out of the way. Then I could see what was below.

Far better to solve the problem in Inkscape, but I don’t know the program, sorry…

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