Glue ups on pg ply

So, I’ve searched for what others are using for glue ups, but i’m still asking lol. I recently made some of the votive candle holders from the catalog and used Gorilla brand (just because that’s what i had #notasponsor lol) thick CA glue. It seems to hold just fine, but man, the tube being metal kind of sucks. Hard to get a precise amount and squeeze out is a bit of a problem on thin materials.

Does anyone have any better suggestions for gluing up thin PG plywood projects?

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CA is probably best. With finished PG you are gluing finish to finish or finish to charred edge so not exactly an ideal situation. CA will hold it together, but don’t rely on it for lots of strength.

Plenty of different manufacturers and container types of CA glue. I bought the 2p-10 adhesive kit. It comes with four different viscosity CA glues and different applicators. If you’re going to be using CA a lot you may want to buy it or something similar so you can experiment and see what you like. It doesn’t appear to be sold on Amazon anymore, but here is a link to some store on the Internet I have never purchased from: 2p-10 adhesive kit.
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I use wood glue when everything is wood and a bit of heavy sandpaper glued to a stick of scrap to mess up just the area to be glued with the proofgrade ( and 2000 sandpaper on the rest to make it shine better)

I also am using a nebulizer and the empty ampules make great throw away "hypodermic"s for materials I need to applyy with precision.
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Yeah, I’ve seen the 2p on a lot of woodworking YouTube videos, and have been meaning to get some to try anyway lol. May have to invest in some

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if you use CA a lot, buying the larger bottles gets significantly cheaper.

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CA seems to work well, I just need to get a little better with putting the right amount in the joints, especially on the thinner projects like the candle holders from the catalog. They do look nice though lol

There are precision tips for CA too.

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oh nice!

precision tips are one solution. i tend to work more with the gels for things like small finger joints because it’s easier to create just a little dot of glue with a light dab and it doesn’t spread out until you actually press the pieces together.

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Yeah, the gorilla thick ca glue i was using was their “precise gel” type. I think I just used a bit too much in some places and got some squeeze out. Got some on my acrylic too which left a spot. I didn’t have the PG frosted acrylic, so I frosted some of my clear lol. The ones I have made up are going to be for demonstration anyway

the 2p-10 kit above also has the debonder, which works pretty well for minor surface cleanup of excess glue. I was just using it yesterday to clean CA off of a metal standoff, where it had dripped down the side and left a whiteish haze.

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I buy disposable kid paint brushes and paint clear gorilla glue on joints.

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Acid brushes (also solder brushes in the plumbing aisle) work great too & tossed when finished. They’re the silver metal tube handles with a half-inchish of bristles on the end. A dime each.

Also Amazon:
Pro Grade - Acid Brushes - 144 Count 3/8" Boar Hair Acid Flux Brushes

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i buy these a lot at Harbor Freight (if you’re familiar) for woodworking stuff, might as well use them for laser stuff too

I buy the gorilla CA glue with the brush in the bottle. Works like a champ.

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hmm, might have to try that too

I did a ton of gluing with that for a sign I made a while back - for small stuff you can’t beat it. But for larger items, it’s probably best to get something you can use to put out a lot in a little time.

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Another vote for the Fastcap kit with precision applicator tips. It has been great (except the “Jel” thickness, which completely solidified within hours of its first use).

Canned air with a thin straw are great for making the tips last through a few uses (point into the trash can and, wear goggles like I do).

I got a silicone glue applicator set for working with wood glue on larger surfaces:

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for wood glue, these are my go-to. fill it up w/wood glue, and i can either run a very thin bead or put tiny little dots on each tiny little finger joint (and i tend to do tiny finger joints, 1 to 1.5mm).

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144 for 8.99 instead of 14.99 for the metal ones.

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