Pre Release | Another Living Hinge Box

pre-release
metal
boxes

#1

Here’s a different way to incorporate metal into your project.

First, I created a stencil in 10mil Mylar, of the shape I wanted the metal in, and cut it on the laser.

Then, I placed some thin (38 ga) soft tooling aluminum over the stencil on a soft surface, and rubbed over the top with a paper stump, to impress the shape in the metal. Moved the operation to a hard surface, and using paper stumps, a Teflon scribe, and embossing tools, I embossed all the lines against the stencil so that the metal would be raised in those areas. Then flattened the in-between portions with a paper stump. I wanted the metal to be gold in color so I gold-leafed it all. Then I painted gesso into all the non-raised areas, colored with Prismacolor pencils, and finished with workable fixatif spray.

The box was made in the same way as some of my other living hinge round boxes. I used Baltic birch, and colored it dark brown with alcohol ink.

Here it is from the top:


#2

Looks great! Thanks for explaining your technique. I’ll have to try it.


#3

Dang girl! You don’t just laser things - you create little works of art! :grinning:

(I tried gold leafing once, years ago. You think the Smurfette PearlEx experience was funny?):roll_eyes:


#4

This is so lovely! Thank you for the detailed write-up. How is the metal attached to the box, is it adhered to a lid under or is it the lid?


#5

Oh, thanks! The metal is super-glued to a piece of wood cut to the diameter of the box.


#6

It looks so much like the leading on stained glass! really wonderful.


#7

Very, very, impressive. Looks like an exquisite cupcake to me.


#8

Cool technique and it looks fantastic.


#9

What a great idea. This is super neat!!


#10

Gorgeous! Nice work lady!!! :heart_eyes:


#11

This is really amazing! I loved reading your play by play technique, though I didn’t ‘get’ half of the terminology or materials. Another avenue of learning for me. Beautiful work!


#12

Beautiful!!


#13

Me neither – though I was having a TIA while reading. :wink:


#14

This is a fantastic idea!
You may already know this, but the technique you are using is almost like repoussé.
The difference is that with repoussé you put the metal on a soft material (usually a bowl of pitch) and then tool into it with little punches.

I really like the idea of cutting the “stencil” and then forming the metal over it, thanks for the detailed writeup!


#15

Kind of off-topic, but related to mylar…

Here’s a tip for people playing with mylar: If you have two sheets that you want to weld together in a seam, lay the two pieces on top of each other and place a sheet of parchment (oven) paper on top. Then run a soldering or wood burning iron across where you want the seam. Works great.

Also, I would not be surprised if you could use parchment paper to soften the full on laser blast in order to weld the sheets together instead of cutting through them.


#16

Whaaat! I’ve never heard of those techniques alone, let alone together.


#17

You should build more kites. It’s a pretty popular technique with kite builders, actually. :slight_smile:


#18

Amazing piece!!! Wow!!!


#19

Whoa…that is super cool!!! Looks lovely! :heart::heart::heart:


#20

FYI. If you get your mylar from me, that may not work. I get mine with a special coating that prevents welding when cut in layers on the laser since we cut up to 5 layers at a time. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes: