Reverse your image for kerf compensation

I know there’s a ton of conversations on here about adjusting for kerf. So I’m not going to add anything new. Just wanted to share my experience. after some frustrating trial and error i finally realized it’s actually quite simple (at least for my design) to get one piece to fit inside another. the main thing I learned was to reflect my inset piece so that it cuts from the back after offsetting the path to 0.006. And my shop logo snapped into place like a glove.

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Nice result. The term I use for this concept is “flip mating”, it’s pretty well documented elsewhere, also commonly mentioned as “kerf profile”. Hunting around for threads with those terms will probably give you a few more ideas about this. One in particular that you might find useful is this:

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Thanks. I appreciate the extra info. One of my challenges was realizing there’s not a as much info on this Topic for people using illustrator.

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That looks very sharp! Thank you for sharing your technique and results.

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Just to check what I’m seeing here: Is that an acrylic inlay cut to fit within another? Acrylic is the most trial and error it has taken for me to get tight and consistent kerf adjustments made—seems like dark and light colors behave differently, and PG white routinely gives me issues cutting thru at PG settings.

Yes PG acrylic. I haven’t run into any issues cutting thru it with PG settings.

Looks nice