How does the catalog handle a failed print?

qa

#1

I was just curious how the “purchase it once” function of the design would handle a failed print.

Is there a “print again, it failed” button?
Is there a time window where you have access to the design?
Is it only guaranteed for proof grade materials and non-proofgrade are buyer beware?


#2

Good question. We are working on that now!


#3

Thanks-- I was wondering about that, too.


#4

I’d guess the GF will have a confirmation that is sent back to the server when a print it completed correctly. Since you need internet to print at all this would be a fairly simple way to handle failed prints… well until someone like me starts using fiddler on it. :smiley: dun dun dunnn


#5

Also, a one off print would stop you being able to make a cardboard prototype or test cut.


#6

Ehh you’re in a grey area there, from what we’ve seen the catalog is to easily print final version copies of things that have been tested to print on X material. If it somehow didn’t work out, thats one thing. But printing your final product on cardboard would be a mistake on your part in my opinion.


#7

The one off print idea seems a bit weird. Maybe just do it like a movie rental? You have 24 hours to print this thing, and it gets locked out?? I am sure I would mess up the one print thing if that is the option.
Also, the one print thing messes up people that would do different pieces with different materials to change things up.


#8

That is a great question. I am wondering about the designs to purchase and how it would work. I’m certainly looking for things to print. It’s just too much work to be creative!


#9

Oh hey @marmak326, would you like to test the svg file I created entirely on my iPad? It’s from this posting:

Light Pads are handy

Cardboard or paper would be fine!


Tangram
#10

Totally disagree. You’re thinking about things in terms of a maker creating your own thing for cheap. These appear to be very creative and higher end finished products, you are essentially buying a finished product at a discount since you print it yourself.

If you botch a print, I am sure customer service will make it right. But what you are describing is buying a shirt from a store, and then going back and saying I want 2 more in different fabrics because I paid for this one.


#11

But it’s so worth it. Once you have a laser your creativity doesn’t have to be limited to a one time use!


#12

Well if you buy a design from elsewhere it is yours, pattern to reprint over and over. Sort of like if you bought a pattern to cut leather, it was then yours and you could do it over and over again. If you buy an SVG or pattern from ebay or istock photo now, it’s yours and does not go away. I understand your point but from a Sales perspective, since their are other options out there right now opposed to buying on the GF catalog, if you GF catalog restricts your use of what you can purchase on there then its kind of a strike against them and if you can find a design similar out there on the web, I would go elsewhere.


#13

Another potential aspect or possible solution might be that results are only guaranteed on proof grade, and the design is meant for whichever proof grade it was designed for.

Perhaps a visually documented end result due to a material defect may or may not be available for a “reprint” token.

Like, you use your own birch ply, it had some voids on it that caused a living hinge to splinter and tear spectacularly, so you took a picture of it within a few minutes of the run end timestamp, then a human decides to give you another run. After the 3rd time they send you one sheet of birch ply proof grade as a courtesy, and tell you no more re-runs.


#14

That’s not quite true across the board. Some places will sell you an unlimited license for a (logo, design, photograph, font, image, video, sound clip…) but that is absolutely not a given.
Always make sure you know what your license entitles you to do (especially if you are working commercially).

For example, Monster Energy told me that they don’t sell a license for their logo at all for certain applications (they are locked into certain clothing deals), and for others there may be a minimum number of licenses to buy. In my case I was asking about licensing the logo for printing onto motorsport wraps, and I was told that I would have to be producing 1000’s or more to qualify for a license.


#15

Personally I would want to buy and own a design to do what i want with, and it looks like the design catalog will give you that option:
Continuing the discussion from Latest update (March '17): "Glowforge Design Catalog, which lets folks purchase either individual prints or unlimited access to the design"
I feel that one button press to get a finished piece is a bit optimistic, in that people will be using different materials, and laser tubes losing strength over time. Maybe a 24 hour rental is a bit much, maybe a 2 hour time limit?


#16

Now your talking Trademarked images, not the use of patterns. No, it’s not a given, but the same reason you can print or use a Trademarked image would be the same as what you are suggesting about GF Designs. Why but a limited use image or pattern if you can find one that is not.


#17

Fully understand the need for an artist or designer to ensure that their hard work is only for the use of the original purchaser and not to be otherwise sold or produced in quantity. I understand the “desire” to sell a design for a single use. The creator should control their own hard work.

On the other hand I can think of no design that I would purchase to make on my machine where I was limited to a single copy. I will mess it up. Guaranteed. I might break it in assembly. I might screw it up when painting it. I might want three in my living room. Manufacturing and materials are cheap. If I get only one and I have to make it myself then I would just buy something similar from a craft show or even China.


#18

I agree, there has to be a degree of trust at some point. The truly dishonest will find a way anyway.


#19

I’m talking in general about trademarked images and copyright images… actually all intellectual property.
Patterns would probably fall into the copyright category, unless it was a pattern based on a trademark, in which case it could well be ®©™.

From iStockPhoto.com:
(which is owned by Getty Images, who are pretty big into this sort of thing :sweat_smile:)

What license am I getting with my downloads?
All files downloaded on iStock include our standard license, which lets you use your file in a wide variety of projects and comes with a $10,000 legal guarantee. When you download with credits you can add extended licenses that let you use the file in even more ways.

When you download with credits, your license never expires. Files licensed with subscriptions must be used in an end project within 30 days of the end of the subscription term or the license for the file terminates.

This is perhaps not the best example in the world, as they are set up quite differently from how the GF catalog seems to be set up; Credits v. subscriptions rather than single-use license v. unlimited use license. They are also relying on their big 'ole team of lawyers to enforce the license, as opposed to a simple digital lockout

I agree, and generally when I buy designs assets or fonts, I buy them with an unlimited commercial license, or find a way to create the asset myself. That is not always possible or economically viable.


#20

Yeah, I think we are probably talking about the same thing. It’s really a difference between commercial use for later sale, and private use. It’s something that every Glowforger out there will have to learn, about what you can use to produce objects for sale, and what you cannot.