Beveling edges

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#1

Is it possible to etch a bevel into a plexiglass or some other substrate? Has anyone attempted this, if so please post a pic of your results.

Since the laser head is always pointing straight toward the bed, I’m guessing beveling could only be achieved by etching a slope down towards a edge.


Creating an angled "cut" at the end of a shape
#2

And you may want to take a look in this section.


#3

You could also try a 3D engrave of a grayscale gradient on the edge, but I don’t know if it would be worth the trouble.


#4

I certainly plan on giving it a try. My guess is it won’t be as graduated as I’d like, but it might be good enough that all I need to do is sand it smooth. I really have 0 idea. But it’s most definitely on my to-do list!


#5

I’ve been curious about if anyone had tried to make a mitered edge using a greyscale too. Is it too fussy to provide the precision needed? Or just enough of a headache to make cynd11’s solution easier?


#6

People have done 3D engraves using greyscale, but I don’t know of any miters specifically.


#7

A router table and chamfer bit would be much faster, cost less tube life, and give a far nicer edge. You could probably do it on your :glowforge: in a pinch, but it’s not really the right tool for the job


#8

Are there small precision desktop routers that could do this at an affordable price?

I’m wondering if a router head will be made for the glowforge. We’re suppose to see future attachment heads.


#9

I think a swivelling laser head would be a better fit with Glowforge. Routing needs signifiant forces and makes a lot of mess.


#10

Yes, since you can get a router bit with a chamfer on it. However if you want something variable, you are talking a more than 3 axis CNC. The smallest really good 5-axis is the PocketNC which costs like a GF and only does small things.


#11

I was thinking of something like this paired with a cheap trim router and chamfer bit, rather than a CNC. For bevelling edges you really don’t need anything complex

For the price of a table like that and a cheap trim router, you could keep a dedicated bevelling table set up somewhere if you thought it was something you would do regularly. Much quicker than using :glowforge: or a CNC


#12

Even if you want to do more than just bevel straight edges, a handheld trim router will do the job just fine. Just cut a template in your :glowforge: and run the router around the inside or outside of it:

Of course a 3+ axis CNC router is also nice if you have one, but most of the time you can get by just fine without :slight_smile:


#13

I’ve got a full sized router table, but if I didn’t already, this would be the way to go.

Moreover, I bet the whole thing could be built with the laser, with those tee-nut slots sorted out by laminating up two or three layers.


#14

Or skip the template, and using a pilot bearing on the bevel bit.


#15

Yeah, if you have space to use a pilot bearing then it’s even easier. I suspect a lot of the sheets I end up cutting in my :glowforge: will be too thin, however


#16

Ah, fair enough. With pilot bearings you must also solve the Inside Corner problem for whatever radius pilot you’re using - which is a whole big reason to use a laser in the first place.


#17

This is true, but it is entirely possible to cut shapes with your glowforge that cannot be beveled by any means. Tiny concave shapes, or thin slots that are close to each other, etc.

I think for most cases the simple router tools you and @Sam are talking about make the most sense. If you absolutely must use CNC control for everything then you are looking at a lot of $!