Hacks to conceal edge joints

Anyone have any great ways to conceal the edges where two flat wood pieces join?

You might like these two threads:

Both talk about that sort of thing.

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If you can’t hide it - accentuate it. Make it a feature.

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What you can’t hide, Flaunt. A very famous rule…
This is an example…

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I haven’t tried it yet, but mitered edges are on my experimental To Do list.

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Then again you can avoid edge connections completely…

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For 90-degree angles, acrylic facades work great.

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I really like this double helix design!!! Great work!

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There are several more “in the hopper” though one is very fishy.

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Well, I no longer have to play coy.

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Hahahahaha punny. :nerd_face:
I really love the design!

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my :glowforge: is still broken waiting for a part… so I’m just looking at things that I can’t make.
::insert Lucille Ball loud cry:::

image

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:cry:
You can plan and get ready?
Wishing your machine good health soon.
:face_with_head_bandage:

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I have completed designs, however, I can’t test betas. For example, I have some leather stitch holes, and no way of determining if they are spaced correctly, the correct distance, etc.
so I completed the design, but may need to go back after testing the holes.

We need a regional Glowforge parts distribution center for Hawaii :slight_smile:

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:eye:

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:eye: :eye: captain.

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You are getting fishy again

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Back to the op.
I have always found that a single plane tends to be weak which is why I went to the fingers system to start with. However, when confronted with a situation where that was not possible, I engraved the interacting area down to less than a millimeter so in the offending area (it was plywood) it was as thin as veneer and worked very well.